main verb

(redirected from main verbs)

main verb

n.
The verb in a verb phrase that expresses the action, state, or relation and is not an auxiliary verb. In the sentence, The bird has flown, fly is the main verb.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

main′ verb′


n.
a word used as the final verb in a verb phrase, expressing the lexical meaning of the verb phrase, as drink in I don't drink, going in I am going, or spoken in We have spoken.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Notice that in sentences (29)-(33), the verb-forms have and has have been used as main verbs and not as auxiliaries.
The collocation and frequencies of the main verbs used in the introduction sections of PhD dissertation were analyzed via the software Antconc (version: 3.4.1.0) by adopting the framework, 'A Typology of Verbs for Scholarly Writing' proposed by Frels, Onwuegbuzie and Slate32.
A non-agentive verb phrase, i.e., "reveal one or more of the following weaknesses", and passive voice, i.e., "is seriously flawed" are the main verbs of the Level 1 and 2 introductory statements.
as main verbs they occupy the central place of any given sentence.
Following the colorfully illustrated story keeps interest high as young readers learn more about English verb usage, including basic definition of verbs, action and being verbs, past, present, and future tense, progressive tense, irregular verbs, main verbs, and helping verbs.
Even main verbs can sometimes be negated without the negative suffix as in (33) (adapted from Uwalaka 2003; 11, glossing is mine):
Compare to the previous work our proposed system imposes semantic constrain on main verbs in question and semantic match on relation using Word Net's meronym, hypernym and hyponyms hierarchy.
Tregex (Levy & Andrew, 2006) is a powerful syntactic tree search language for identifying syntactic elements (e.g., main verbs of sentences) and which has been used by researchers (Heilman & Smith, 2010) to define wh-movement rules.
Furthermore, verbs such as omit, deny, neglect, escape, and eschew are implicative, but since their complements are not posterior to the main verbs, (28) does not apply to them.
Their function is to coordinate main verbs and form V1-V2 complex verbal constructions in which V, is main verb and V2 is light verb.