mainprise


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mainprise

(ˈmeɪnˌpraɪz) legal history
n
(Law) an assurance declaring that a prisoner will appear in court
vb (tr)
(Law) to allow a prisoner to go free based on a guarantee that he or she will appear in court on the designated day
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References in periodicals archive ?
(a): 'The release of a prisoner on someone's undertaking to act as surety for him, mainprise'.
Appointment, by mainprise of John Perle and John Dracy, of the county of Dorset, of Roger Juyot to the custody, during her idiocy, of the lands of Lucy, daughter and heir of Geoffrey atte Brigge, in Whitchirche in that county, held of the heir of Edmund de Mortuo Mari, late earl of March, tenant in chief, who, by inquisition of John Pokeswell, escheator, and by examination before the king in Chancery, was not found to be an idiot from birth, yet by the examination of her personally in Chancery is found to be one now.' (22) Lucy atte Brigge was thought be an idiot, but was found to not be an idiot, but then was declared before the King to be an idiot again.
(39.) See Halliday, supra note 2, at 17, 40-41 (noting historians' consideration of the writs de homine repligiando, de odio et atia, and mainprise as possible antecedents to habeas corpus ad subjiciendum).