maist

maist

(mest)
determiner
a Scot word for most
Mentioned in ?
References in classic literature ?
Thus measuring things in Heav'n by things on Earth At thy request, and that thou maist beware By what is past, to thee I have reveal'd What might have else to human Race bin hid; The discord which befel, and Warr in Heav'n Among th' Angelic Powers, and the deep fall Of those too high aspiring, who rebelld With SATAN, hee who envies now thy state, Who now is plotting how he may seduce Thee also from obedience, that with him Bereavd of happiness thou maist partake His punishment, Eternal miserie; Which would be all his solace and revenge, As a despite don against the most High, Thee once to gaine Companion of his woe.
It is not just an image of a grotesque execution, but a figure that points to the salvation of the world: "This with the eie of Faith thou maist behold" (1169).
25) Greene's strategy of projecting English-supported reforms upon the Scottish scene extends to his choice of names for key characters, as will become further apparent; the upright Bishop of St Andrews serves as a virtual corrective to the notorious personage condemned by Lyndsay in a satirical poem regularly included in editions of his works: 'The Tragedie of the vmquhyle maist Reuerend Father Dauid be the Mercie of God, Cardinall, and Archbischop of Sanctandrois, &c'.
O--thou maist work and starve; O--and I may beg and live: O--but from thee I cannot live: O--I cannot, nor I wonnot, so I wonnot.
The subject pronoun form in the singular is always in concord with a verb in the indicative mood and with a modal, which is indicated by the preservation of the inflectional endings {-st} and {-t}, for example, thou maist, thou shalt, and thou dost.
maist behold thy face / And thine owne realmes in lond of Faery, / And in this antique ymage thy great auncestry" (4.
The lasses staw frae 'mang them a', To pou their stalks 0' corn: But Rab slips out, and jinks about, Behint the muckle thorn: He grippet Nelly hard an' fast; Loud skirl'd a' the lasses; But her tap-pickle maist was lost, When kuitlin' in the fause-house Wi' him that night.
The festival runs until Sunday 13th October, although one event has managed to reach out passed the final date and it certainly looks like a laugh - Doric Call My Bluff at Inverurie town Hall on Wednesday 23rd October - let's see fa kens the maist Doric wirds
33) "cruelly delyting in all mischeiffis, and maist unnaturallie and cruelly"; Julian Goodare and Michael Lynch note the deterioration in government's perception of these two areas from 1587; measures used previously in the Borders were now to be attempted in the Highlands and Islands.
What fole quod the fox thou maist abide wel inough, the lyon ment not by thee, for it is none horn that is in thine head.
Thou maist yt not denye, For in pleyn text, withouten nede of glose, Thou hast translated the Romaunce of the Rose, That is an heresye ayeins my lawe, And makest wise folk fro me withdrawe; And of Creseyde thou hast seyd as the lyste, That maketh men to wommen lasse to triste.
However, a surviving description of Cecil's deformities by Theodore de Mayerne, a French physician who examined Cecil near the end of the Secretary's life, indicates a serious set of physical impairments that was likely congenital, and there is some additional evidence for this: Robert Cecil's daughter Frances was also deformed; and before Cecil had even contemplated marriage, his father had warned Robert that, when seeking a wife, he should "make not choyse of a dwarf or a foole, for from the one thou maist beget a race of Pigmees, the other may be thy daily disgrace" (Braunmuller 278).