maître d'hôtel

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Related to maitres d'hotel: Maître d'hôtel, maître d’

maî·tre d'hô·tel

 (mā′trə dō-tĕl′)
n. pl. maî·tres d'hô·tel (mā′trə dō-tĕl′)
1. A headwaiter.
2. A major-domo.
3. A sauce of melted butter, chopped parsley, lemon juice, salt, and pepper.

[French maître d'hôtel : maître, master + de, of + hôtel, house.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

maître d'hôtel

(ˌmɛtrə dəʊˈtɛl; French mɛtrə dotɛl)
n, pl maîtres d'hôtel
1. (Professions) a head waiter or steward
2. (Professions) the manager or owner of a hotel
[C16: from French: master of (the) hotel]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

maître d'hôtel

A French phrase meaning master of the hotel, used to mean a headwaiter or major-domo.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.maître d'hôtel - a dining-room attendant who is in charge of the waiters and the seating of customersmaitre d'hotel - a dining-room attendant who is in charge of the waiters and the seating of customers
dining-room attendant, restaurant attendant - someone employed to provide service in a dining room
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in classic literature ?
The sound of this bell caused a door to be opened in the offices on the left hand of the court, from which filed two maitres d'hotel followed by eight scullions bearing a kind of hand-barrow loaded with dishes under silver covers.
One of the maitres d'hotel, the first in rank, touched one of the guards, who was snoring on his bench, slightly with his wand; he even carried his kindness so far as to place the halbert which stood against the wall in the hands of the man stupid with sleep, after which the soldier, without explanation, escorted the viande of Monsieur to the refectory, preceded by a page and the two maitres d'hotel.
So guards, scullions, maitres d'hotel, and pages having passed, they resumed their places at the table; and the sun, which, through the window-frame, had for an instant fallen upon those two charming countenances, now only shed its light upon the gilliflowers, primroses, and rosetree.