major party


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major party

n.
A political party having enough strength to gain control of a government with comparative regularity.

ma′jor par′ty


n.
a political party able to gain periodic control of the government or to offer significant opposition to the party in power.
[1945–50]
References in classic literature ?
On the other hand, when the sedition had proceeded from causes which had inflamed the resentments of the major party, they might often be found obstinate and inexorable, when policy demanded a conduct of forbearance and clemency.
In the extended republic of the United States, and among the great variety of interests, parties, and sects which it embraces, a coalition of a majority of the whole society could seldom take place on any other principles than those of justice and the general good; whilst there being thus less danger to a minor from the will of a major party, there must be less pretext, also, to provide for the security of the former, by introducing into the government a will not dependent on the latter, or, in other words, a will independent of the society itself.
@josephmdurso Now every other major party, however briefly, has had a female leader, save Labour @lewis_goodall For my thesis, I'm currently reading through the ENTIRE second reading of the EU Notification of Withdrawal Bill in both Houses, and my GOD does Alex Salmond have an infuriating habit of directing the conversation off course and away from the legislation at hand @OliverNorgrove
Opposition parties, at present, are divided on the issue of toppling the government before time while Maulana Fazlur Rehman stands on its stance of declaring the majority of the incumbent government as fake while the standpoint of a major party is that the assemblies should complete their five years term.
But, unfortunately, in Sindh, where the PPP had been a major party for the last almost 25 years, infants are dying every year owing to inadequate healthcare and malnutrition.
Since June 2016, the percentage of respondents who do not identify with either major party has risen steadily, peaking at 46.6 percent in April this year.
Any independent or new party candidates who secure a ballot position will follow the major party candidates.
The bottom line: Lack of interest, lack of money and lack of support can all contribute to a major party failing to put a candidate up for election in a given race - especially in heavily gerrymandered districts.
-- Nearly twice as many Americans today think a third major party is needed in the U.S.
While these candidates are unlikely to defeat Trump and Clinton, some experts believe that after the election there's potential for a new major party to emerge.
This campaign is the first in which a major party has nominated an outsider with no experience in public service - military or civilian - and whose platform consists of vague generalities punctuated by outrageous statements.
It has the advantage for the major parties that if, in spite of this liberation of voters, the minor party still fails to win then it will not in the process of trying split the vote of the major party.