major-league


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ma·jor-league

(mā′jər-lēg′)
adj.
1. Sports Of or relating to a major league: major-league baseball.
2. Informal Prominent or important: a major-league ballet company.
3. Informal Impressive, as in extent or quantity: "a destination for major-league wooing" (Bryan Miller).
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:

major-league

adjective
Being among the leaders in one's field:
Translations

major-league

[ˌmeɪdʒəˈliːg] CPD (US) major-league baseball Nbéisbol m de la liga principal
References in classic literature ?
My speed and control must both have been above the ordinary, for I made such a record during my senior year at college that overtures were made to me in behalf of one of the great major-league teams; but in the tightest pitch that ever had confronted me in the past I had never been in such need for control as now.
The Cubs have hired former major-league relief pitcher Craig Breslow as director of strategic initiatives for baseball operations.
Can you please list the major-league managers, since 2000, who were catchers during their major-league playing careers?
Joe Gordon, another Oregon Hall of Famer who played second base for the Yankees and managed four major-league teams, was responsible for signing Averill to a contract with the Indians.
Then again, Eddie Gaedel only had one major-league plate appearance, at Sportsman's Park in St.
With Carlos Ruiz and Wil Nieves ready to man the major-league catching roster, Hill will join Cameron Rupp, Tommy Joseph and Sebastian Valle in the minor leagues in case either Ruiz or Nieves is injured.
In 1947, Jackie Robinson became the first African-American player in major-league baseball, which had been segregated until then.
Several themes are interwoven though the text: the reputation of early baseball players and how that changed during the 1920s due to the presence of Babe Ruth and other baseball greats; the role of racism in the South, particularly Florida, and how major-league teams reacted to racism after Jackie Robinson broke the color line in 1947; the ongoing struggles of Florida towns and cities to attract and keep major-league teams for spring training; and finally, the rise of other spring training locales, particularly Arizona and to a lesser extent the threat posed by Las Vegas.
The International League consisted of many of the largest northeastern cities in North America that did not have a major-league team: Baltimore, Buffalo, Jersey City, Montreal, Newark, Providence, Rochester, and Toronto.
The Miami-based Bean is also the author of Going the Other Way: Lessons From a Life In and Out of Major-League Baseball.
Major-league baseball may seem an unlikely setting for the study of ideology in action, but the sport's recent history offers an object lesson in just how powerful prevailing dogma can be--especially when it presents itself merely as common sense.
And they look at the billboards plastered around the stadium, which advertisers pay for, piling up more money in the major-league coffers.