amends

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a·mends

 (ə-mĕndz′)
pl.n. (used with a sing. or pl. verb)
Recompense for grievance or injury: The new law offers no amends to victims of crime. I assured them that no amends are necessary. You must make amends to them for the insult.

[Middle English amendes, from Old French, pl. of amende, reparation, from amender, to amend; see amend.]

amends

(əˈmɛndz)
n
(functioning as singular) recompense or compensation given or gained for some injury, insult, etc: to make amends.
[C13: from Old French amendes fines, from amende compensation, from amender to emend]

a•mends

(əˈmɛndz)

n. (used with a sing. or pl. v.)
reparation or compensation for a loss, damage, or injury of any kind; recompense.
Idioms:
make amends, to compensate, as for an injury, loss, or insult.
[1275–1325; Middle English amendes < Middle French, pl. of amende reparation, n. derivative of amender to amend]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.amends - a sum of money paid in compensation for loss or injuryamends - a sum of money paid in compensation for loss or injury
compensation - something (such as money) given or received as payment or reparation (as for a service or loss or injury)
relief - (law) redress awarded by a court; "was the relief supposed to be protection from future harm or compensation for past injury?"
actual damages, compensatory damages, general damages - (law) compensation for losses that can readily be proven to have occurred and for which the injured party has the right to be compensated
nominal damages - (law) a trivial sum (usually $1.00) awarded as recognition that a legal injury was sustained (as for technical violations of a contract)
exemplary damages, punitive damages, smart money - (law) compensation in excess of actual damages (a form of punishment awarded in cases of malicious or willful misconduct)
atonement, expiation, satisfaction - compensation for a wrong; "we were unable to get satisfaction from the local store"
2.amends - something done or paid in expiation of a wrongamends - something done or paid in expiation of a wrong; "how can I make amends"
atonement, expiation, propitiation - the act of atoning for sin or wrongdoing (especially appeasing a deity)

amends

noun
Translations

amends

[əˈmendz] NPL to make amends (to sb) for sth (= apologize) → dar satisfacción (a algn) por algo; (= compensate) → compensar (a algn) por algo
I'll try to make amends in futuretrataré de dar satisfacción en el futuro

amends

pl to make amends for somethingetw wiedergutmachen; to make amends to somebody for somethingjdn für etw entschädigen; I’ll try to make amendsich werde versuchen, das wiedergutzumachen

amends

[əˈmɛndz] npl to make amends (to sb) for sth (apologize) → farsi perdonare (da qn) per qc; (compensate) → risarcire or indennizzare (qn) per qc
References in classic literature ?
I hate that talk o' people, as if there was a way o' making amends for everything.
Lydgate's ear had caught eagerly her mention of the living, and as soon as he could, he reopened the subject, seeing here a possibility of making amends for the casting-vote he had once given with an ill-satisfied conscience.
We made that small house ring with boisterous mirth and resound with the murmur of much sober talk, making amends then to Walden vale for the long silences.
But she was certainly in the habit of making amends for the offense that she gave by her violence.
That semi-final is still in the back of the boys' minds and we're looking forward to making amends.
In his last movie, Tony Scott took Welles at his word while making amends (with star Denzel Washington) for that Pelham 123 train wreck.
However, when the news breaks in their small town, they are ostracised by the community, and one of their wives becomes obsessed with making amends.
Our study found that making amends gives us permission to let go.
If you love your club, and I think you do the fans will forgive, because youwould be making amends.
Shearer went some way to making amends with a superb save to keep out John-Joe O'-Toole's long-range strike.