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Related to malacca: malacca cane


 (mə-lăk′ə, -lä′kə)
The stem of a rattan palm, formerly used for making canes and umbrella handles.

[After Malacca (now Melaka), a town of western Malaysia.]


(məˈlækə) or

malacca cane

1. (Plants) the stem of the rattan palm
2. (Clothing & Fashion) a walking stick made from this stem


(məˈlækə) or


(Placename) a state of SW Peninsular Malaysia: rubber plantations. Capital: Malacca. Pop: 635 791 (2000). Area: 1683 sq km (650 sq miles)


(məˈlæk ə, -ˈlɑ kə)

1. a state in Malaysia, on the SW Malay Peninsula. 504,502; 640 sq. mi. (1658 sq. km).
2. the capital of this state. 295,999.
3. Strait of, a strait between Sumatra and the Malay Peninsula.
Also, Melaka (for defs. 1,2).
Ma•lac′can, adj., n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Malacca - stem of the rattan palm used for making canes and umbrella handlesmalacca - stem of the rattan palm used for making canes and umbrella handles
cane - a strong slender often flexible stem as of bamboos, reeds, rattans, or sugar cane
Calamus rotang, rattan, rattan palm - climbing palm of Sri Lanka and southern India remarkable for the great length of the stems which are used for malacca canes
2.malacca - a cane made from the stem of a rattan palm
cane - a stick that people can lean on to help them walk
References in classic literature ?
This rampart is pierced by several sally-ports for the convenience of ships and whales; conspicuous among which are the straits of Sunda and Malacca.
At this point indicated on the planisphere one of these currents was rolling, the Kuro-Scivo of the Japanese, the Black River, which, leaving the Gulf of Bengal, where it is warmed by the perpendicular rays of a tropical sun, crosses the Straits of Malacca along the coast of Asia, turns into the North Pacific to the Aleutian Islands, carrying with it trunks of camphor-trees and other indigenous productions, and edging the waves of the ocean with the pure indigo of its warm water.
The varied landscape afforded by the Andaman Islands was soon passed, however, and the Rangoon rapidly approached the Straits of Malacca, which gave access to the China seas.
He turned over the pages with great decision, as if he were judging the book in its entirety, the printing and paper and binding, as well as the poetry, and then, having satisfied himself of its good or bad quality, he placed it on the writing-table, and examined the malacca cane with the gold knob which had belonged to the soldier.
Denham merely smiled, and replacing the malacca cane on the rack, he drew a sword from its ornamental sheath.
Denham looked at her as she sat in her grandfather's arm-chair, drawing her great-uncle's malacca cane smoothly through her fingers, while her background was made up equally of lustrous blue-and-white paint, and crimson books with gilt lines on them.
Dry and spare, as lean as a jockey and as tough as whipcord, he might be seen any day swinging his silver-headed Malacca cane, and pacing along the suburban roads with the same measured gait with which he had been wont to tread the poop of his flagship.
Hooker, extend along the heights of the peninsula of Malacca, and are thinly scattered, on the one hand over India and on the other as far north as Japan.
that is to say, among the Philippine and Malacca isles.
In this voyage, being by contrary winds obliged to beat up and down a great while in the Straits of Malacca and among the islands, we were no sooner got clear of those difficult seas than we found our ship had sprung a leak, but could not discover where it was.
I was some time of my partner's opinion; but after a little more serious thinking, I told him I thought it was a very great hazard for us to attempt returning to Bengal, for that we were on the wrong side of the Straits of Malacca, and that if the alarm was given, we should be sure to be waylaid on every side--that if we should be taken, as it were, running away, we should even condemn ourselves, and there would want no more evidence to destroy us.
Geographically, the Strait of Malacca is 500 nautical miles in length and extremely narrow, especially along its southern half where it ranges from a mere 20 nautical miles wide to as little as 9 nautical miles at the southern end.