maladaptive

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mal·a·dap·tive

 (măl′ə-dăp′tĭv)
adj.
1. Marked by faulty or inadequate adaptation.
2. Not assisting or promoting adaptation.

maladaptive

(ˌmæləˈdæptɪv)
adj
1. unsuitably adapted or adapting poorly to (a situation, purpose, etc)
2. not encouraging adaptation
ˌmalaˈdapted adj
ˌmalaˈdaptively adv
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.maladaptive - showing faulty adaptation
adaptative, adaptive - having a capacity for adaptation; "the adaptive coloring of a chameleon"
References in periodicals archive ?
However, currently available antidepressants are largely restricted to targeting the systems that regulate serotonin, dopamine, and other related neurotransmitters, and these treatments do not specifically address inflammation and synaptic maladaptations that are now known to be associated with major depressive disorder.
Many psychiatric and neurological disorders are a constellation of symptoms and represent an unfortunate synergy of heterogeneous maladaptations," MelAaAaAeA n said.
Depending on the nature of the culture-the deep structures that rarely, if ever, change through time-accidents of history may cripple entire peoples psychologically and result in maladaptations as indigenous social structures collapse.
An atmospherics of security refuses resilience thinking's demands that change become legible as either proper adaptations or improper maladaptations.
These maladaptations, which together further predispose the individual to proinflammatory responses, are postulated to stem at least in part from alterations in HPA-axis signalling.
After a HMIs, especially regarding BFlh, several long-lasting maladaptations have been described: a reduced BFlh muscle volume with BFsh hypertrophy 5 - 23 months after the injury (17, 19); eccentric strength deficits, decreased EMG activity (39, 40), and other strength and functional test deficiencies (41).
Now, as a result of a number of interrelated "cultural maladaptations," we face a major crisis of unsustainability--the system is seriously broken and in need of healing.
This book reviews the literature describing the maladaptations that occur in skeletal muscle in response to the most common lifestyle-associated chronic diseases: chronic heart failure (CHF) and chronic non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM).
He approaches the latter task from a positivist paradigm of science, and concludes that Bengal's maladaptations could have been avoided and can be changed.