maladjustive


Also found in: Thesaurus.

maladjustive

(ˌmæləˈdʒʌstɪv)
adj
poorly adjusted or not favorable for adjustment
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.maladjustive - poorly adjusted
maladaptive - showing faulty adaptation
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
It remained moderate for combined scoring categories as overall for interpersonal as r=0.39, environmental as r=25, maladjustive as r=36 and withdrawal as r=54 Cronbach alpha remained high for other scoring categories and groups including action for neurotic=0.86, crippled for maladjusted r=65, direction for normal r=62, aggression for psychotic r=60, bizarre for maladjusted, psychotic and overall r=72, 0.84 and 0.83 respectively.
Third domain is maladjustive category which is representative of neurotic protocol and is further categorized as tension, crippled and fear responses.
California defines psychology as the use of "psychological principles, methods, and procedures of understanding, predicting, and influencing behavior," which include the "prevention, treatment, and amelioration of psychological problems and emotional and mental disorders," as well as any effort to help a person "modify feelings, conditions, attitudes," or change "behavior[s] which are emotionally, intellectually, or socially ineffectual or maladjustive," or even just to "acquire greater human effectiveness." Whatever that last phrase might mean, it is clear that this is a list of different types of speech.
They limited their meta-analysis to psychotherapy studies conducted in a school or addressing school-related problems, with the broad definition of psychotherapy that included the informed and planful application of techniques derived from established psychological principles by persons qualified through training and experience to understand these principles and to apply these techniques with the intention of assisting individuals to modify such personal characteristics as feelings, values, attitudes and behaviors which are judged by the therapist to be maladaptive or maladjustive. (Prout & DeMartino, pp.
It involves examining the role and redefining it, if necessary, so that it supports and expands the healthy aspects of the self, and extinguishes its maladjustive conditioning....
Other typical maladjustive responses to trauma include self-abusiveness, self-destructiveness (including increased risk-taking behavior), and behavioral patterns that reflect anxious/avoidant attachments or anxious/resistant attachments (Armsworth & Holaday, 1993; Gordon, Farberow, & Maida, 1999; Motta, 1994; Richards & Bates, 1997).