maladroitness


Also found in: Thesaurus.

mal·a·droit

 (măl′ə-droit′)
adj.
Marked by a lack of adroitness; inept.
n.
An inept person.

[French : mal-, mal- + adroit, adroit; see adroit.]

mal′a·droit′ly adv.
mal′a·droit′ness n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.maladroitness - unskillfulness resulting from a lack of trainingmaladroitness - unskillfulness resulting from a lack of training
unskillfulness - a lack of cognitive skill
rustiness - ineptitude or awkwardness as a consequence of age or lack of practice; "his rustiness showed when he was asked to speed up"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

maladroitness

[ˈmæləˈdrɔɪtnɪs] Ntorpeza f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

maladroitness

Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in periodicals archive ?
He deplored maladroitness of federal government in bringing Dr.
Conversely, the inventions of the great masters of fiction "have a conviction, a logic, a lack of the banality and maladroitness which vitiates most of what we see and hear" (13).
Or, maybe, it was just another case of maladroitness. Surely, it could not be an American design to scuttle talks in the context of an earnest desire to leave Afghanistan.
The faults pertain not merely to correctable bureaucratic inefficiencies and maladroitness but a policymaking approach that burnishes its elitist discretion in the midst of financial crises.
The two short scenes showcase Peter's maladroitness as well as the pic's underlying vein of character driven humor.
This is perhaps the thing that most bothers British conservatives about Charles: his political maladroitness threatens the prestige of the monarchy.
Adopting and disputing the public discourse of Parliament, there is an aspect of well-intentioned maladroitness to the poem: Lewis concedes so many of the charges against Bacon before mounting his defense that the eventual grounds for support are delayed and diminished.