malapropism


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mal·a·prop·ism

 (măl′ə-prŏp-ĭz′əm)
n.
1. Ludicrous misuse of a word, especially by confusion with one of similar sound.
2. An example of such misuse.

[From malaprop.]

mal′a·prop′i·an (-prŏp′ē-ən) adj.

malapropism

(ˈmæləprɒpˌɪzəm)
n
1. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) the unintentional misuse of a word by confusion with one of similar sound, esp when creating a ridiculous effect, as in I am not under the affluence of alcohol
2. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) the habit of misusing words in this manner
[C18: after Mrs Malaprop in Sheridan's play The Rivals (1775), a character who misused words, from malapropos]
ˈmalaprop, ˌmalaˈpropian adj

mal•a•prop•ism

(ˈmæl ə prɒpˌɪz əm)

n.
1. a confused use of words in which an appropriate word is replaced by one with similar sound but ludicrously inappropriate meaning.
2. an instance of this, as in “Lead the way and we'll precede.”
[1840–50; after Mrs. Malaprop, a character in Sheridan's The Rivals (1775)]

malapropism

1. the unconscious use of an inappropriate word, especially in a cliché, as fender for feather in “You could have knocked me over with a fender.” [Named after Mrs. Malaprop, a character prone to such uses, in The Rivals, by Richard Brinsley Sheridan]
2. an instance of such misuse. Cf. heterophemism.
See also: Language

malapropism

Unintentional use of a wrong word for one that it sounds like.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.malapropism - the unintentional misuse of a word by confusion with one that sounds similarmalapropism - the unintentional misuse of a word by confusion with one that sounds similar
misstatement - a statement that contains a mistake
Translations
perronisme

malapropism

[ˈmæləprɒpɪzəm] Nlapsus m inv linguae, equivocación f de palabras

malapropism

nMalapropismus m
References in periodicals archive ?
Mae Linda yn cytuno, gan gyfaddef ei bod hi, fel ei chymeriad, yn dioddef o malapropism, y tueddiad i ddrysu geiriau.
Sheridan's character was so loved the term malapropism was coined in her honour.
"I didn't realize the degree of which the malapropism would trigger this furor.
This view of history isn't entirely wrong, though it has been almost comically obscured in the global imaginationas demonstrated most recently by President Barack Obama's widely quoted malapropism in referring to "Polish death camps" when he awarded a posthumous Presidential Medal of Freedom to the Polish World War II hero Jan Karski.
A mat made of bamboo may conceal a malapropism. A malaprop may well conceal one clever emendation.
"Clarke's accidental malapropism during yesterday's presentation summed it all up.
Shakespeare will probably be turning in his grave at his inclusion in this esteemed group of the English language elite but Palin -- like Bush -- has decided to rewrite ( or rephrase) the language with her own brand of malapropism.
But when it's naively repeated, it becomes a malapropism as well.
2.00 DELORIA, 2.35 EMERALD COMMANDER, 3.10 SHOWCASING (NAP), 3.45 STRAITS OF HORMUZ, 4.20 MALAPROPISM, 4.55 THE CHEKA, 5.30 HATCH A PLAN DOUBLE: SHOWCASING and BENRISH (2.45 Nottingham)
For example the unfortunate use of 'toxic assets' - a malapropism if there ever was one and typical of American English - coined to conceal the simplicity and clarity of 'bad debt'.
Malaprop litters her dialogue with humorous errors in usage, such as "He is the pineapple of politeness." (9) Her name is derived from the French mal a propos, meaning "mal, 'badly,' a, 'to,' and propos, 'purpose, subject,' and means 'inappropriate.'" (10) The popularity of The Rivals led to the eventual adoption of the term malapropism, defined today as "an act or habit of misusing words ridiculously, esp.
Nine chapters cover such things as omissions (unfinished thoughts, omitted nouns and verbs, swearing), substitutions (malapropism, nicknames, exaggerations, euphemism), transformations (reverse order, repeated structures), reverberations (divided couplets, repetitions), order (similes, metaphor, personification), words (prefixes, suffixes, compound words), additions (abuse, curses, superfluous words), repetitions (repeated consonants, vowels, syllables), and disorder (paradox, puns, oxymoron).