maldistribution

mal·dis·tri·bu·tion

 (măl′dĭs-trə-byo͞o′shən)
n.
Faulty distribution or apportionment, as of resources, over an area or among a group.

maldistribution

(ˌmældɪstrɪˈbjuːʃən)
n
faulty, unequal, or unfair distribution (as of wealth, business, etc)
References in periodicals archive ?
Another grave concern is the current geographical and socio-economic maldistribution of PET-CT facilities, with the unavailability of this service to a large number of South Africans, especially those who cannot afford high-tech medical care.
The second essay titled "A Contemporary Analysis of James Madison's Concerns about Maldistribution of Wealth and Its Relationship to the Survival of Free Government", for example, is an in-depth analysis of Madison's deeply held belief that peace and distribution of wealth are inseparable.
Schaller blames the two administrations' economic policies for the increasing maldistribution of wealth and massive federal deficits.
However, in practice there was substantial and recurring maldistribution. The description provided by the authors is instructive: "In some alternate paths the flow may be almost free of solids and friction losses may predominate; in others there may be almost no gas flow and static head losses prevail.
low-intensity conflict; limited commitment by the intervening state; difficulties in eliminating external support for the insurgent group; divisive societal problems caused by maldistribution of wealth, poverty, corruption, repression, and collapse of social structure; longstanding mutual hostility among the sides; inadequate adaptability by the intervening state to the changing predicament; and insufficient stamina by the intervening state for protracted conflict.
We cannot call ourselves a moral people and let this kind of maldistribution continue, particularly when it brings suffering to tens of millions of people.
Public policies have not created this stark increase in the maldistribution of wealth.
(38) Most significantly, in relation to long-term metabolic morbidity and cardiovascular risk, the lipid kinetic and fat storage abnormalities that underlie fat maldistribution are strongly associated with rapid development of the metabolic syndrome.
Thomas by contrast contended, "It's not that we're not spending enough money for health care, it's the maldistribution of benefits."
Finally, Cahill, in a prophetic critique, blends elements from Catholic social thought and Reinhold Niebuhr's Christian realism to confront issues of maldistribution, including future genetic resources, which generate the scandalous disparities between the world's haves and have-nots.
* Recruitment and retention; addressing maldistribution within countries, and out-migration
There is a maldistribution in the sense that we have 20 percent of the people in the world getting 74 percent of the income, and 80 percent get 26 percent of the income.