male chauvinism


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male chauvinist

n.
A man whose behavior and attitude toward women indicate a belief that they are innately inferior to men.

male chauvinism n.

male chauvinism

n
the belief, held or alleged to be held by certain men, that men are inherently superior to women
male chauvinist n, adj
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.male chauvinism - activity indicative of belief in the superiority of men over womenmale chauvinism - activity indicative of belief in the superiority of men over women
sexism - discriminatory or abusive behavior towards members of the opposite sex
Translations

male chauvinism

nmaschilismo
References in periodicals archive ?
It shows a patronising attitude and male chauvinism.
He attributes the Jesuit failure to take this step, at least in part, to "a bit of male chauvinism in the order--maybe more than a little--that has to change if the Society doesn't want to end up a relic" (64).
The Indian girl raped on the bus shocked a nation as more examples of ugly male chauvinism were exposed and continue to occur.
It's about unrelenting male chauvinism and determined feminism where, finally, a bit of understanding brings a sense of order in a couple's disturbed life.
All Indians should applaud women achievers like Jayalalithaa who challenge male chauvinism in society.
The image of the military is still a macho image - the last bastion of male chauvinism.
But the reasons for this are fallaciously served when we unquestioningly accept the ostensible notion of male chauvinism as its singular de facto cause.
I have faced discrimination, sexual harassment, physical assault, ignorance, prejudice, and male chauvinism.
The whole era marked the clash of male chauvinism and feminism," Ferrell says.
There are two halves to the non-profit sector, one half representing and prospering from the status quo, and the other half, of a corrective nature, addressing itself to rights and issues that are too controversial and too unpopular for consideration by legislators, executives and political parties of an establishment characterized by white supremacy and male chauvinism.
Refusing to shield themselves in this way, a few radical women authors of the 1930s broke ranks with their more cautious sisters and boldly exposed the male chauvinism that infected the revolutionary movement in that decade.