malediction

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Related to maledictory: immured

mal·e·dic·tion

 (măl′ĭ-dĭk′shən)
n.
1.
a. The calling down of a curse.
b. A curse.
2. Slander.

mal′e·dic′to·ry (-dĭk′tə-rē) adj.

malediction

(ˌmælɪˈdɪkʃən)
n
1. the utterance of a curse against someone or something
2. slanderous accusation or comment
[C15: from Latin maledictiō a reviling, from male ill + dīcere to speak]
ˌmaleˈdictive, ˌmaleˈdictory adj

mal•e•dic•tion

(ˌmæl ɪˈdɪk ʃən)

n.
a curse; imprecation.
[1400–50]
mal`e•dic′tive, mal`e•dic′to•ry (-tə ri) adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.malediction - the act of calling down a curse that invokes evil (and usually serves as an insult)malediction - the act of calling down a curse that invokes evil (and usually serves as an insult); "he suffered the imprecations of the mob"
curse, execration, condemnation - an appeal to some supernatural power to inflict evil on someone or some group

malediction

noun
A denunciation invoking a wish or threat of evil or injury:
Archaic: malison.
Translations

malediction

[ˌmælɪˈdɪkʃən] Nmaldición f

malediction

nFluch m, → Verwünschung f
References in classic literature ?
He invaded the turmoil and tumble of the down-town streets and learned to breathe maledictory defiance at the police who occasionally used to climb up, drag him from his perch and beat him.
The first part of this speech comprised his whole store of maledictory expression, and was uttered with a slight snarl easy to imagine.
The curse is a very central element of the play Richard III, where many characters use the curse as maledictory formulas that have been approved by a higher authority.