malefactor

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Related to malefactions: pestilent

mal·e·fac·tor

 (măl′ə-făk′tər)
n.
1. One who has committed a crime; a criminal.
2. A wrongdoer or evildoer.

[Middle English malefactour, from Latin malefactor, from malefacere, to do wrong : male, ill; see mel- in Indo-European roots + facere, to do; see dhē- in Indo-European roots.]

mal′e·fac′tion (-făk′shən) n.

malefactor

(ˈmælɪˌfæktə)
n
a criminal; wrongdoer
[C15: via Old French from Latin, from malefacere to do evil]
ˈmaleˌfaction n
ˈmaleˌfactress fem n

mal•e•fac•tor

(ˈmæl əˌfæk tər)

n.
1. a person who violates the law; criminal.
2. a person who does evil.
[1400–50; < Latin malefactor=malefac(ere) to act wickedly (see male-, fact) + -tor -tor]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.malefactor - someone who has committed a crime or has been legally convicted of a crimemalefactor - someone who has committed a crime or has been legally convicted of a crime
accessary, accessory - someone who helps another person commit a crime
arsonist, firebug, incendiary - a criminal who illegally sets fire to property
blackmailer, extortioner, extortionist - a criminal who extorts money from someone by threatening to expose embarrassing information about them
bootlegger, moonshiner - someone who makes or sells illegal liquor
briber, suborner - someone who pays (or otherwise incites) you to commit a wrongful act
coconspirator, conspirator, machinator, plotter - a member of a conspiracy
desperado, desperate criminal - a bold outlaw (especially on the American frontier)
fugitive from justice, fugitive - someone who is sought by law officers; someone trying to elude justice
gangster, mobster - a criminal who is a member of gang
highbinder - a corrupt politician
highjacker, hijacker - someone who uses force to take over a vehicle (especially an airplane) in order to reach an alternative destination
hood, hoodlum, punk, strong-armer, thug, toughie, goon, tough - an aggressive and violent young criminal
gaolbird, jail bird, jailbird - a criminal who has been jailed repeatedly
abductor, kidnaper, kidnapper, snatcher - someone who unlawfully seizes and detains a victim (usually for ransom)
mafioso - a member of the Mafia crime syndicate in the United States
gangster's moll, gun moll, moll - the girlfriend of a gangster
liquidator, manslayer, murderer - a criminal who commits homicide (who performs the unlawful premeditated killing of another human being)
principal - (criminal law) any person involved in a criminal offense, regardless of whether the person profits from such involvement
parolee, probationer - someone released on probation or on parole
drug dealer, drug peddler, drug trafficker, peddler, pusher - an unlicensed dealer in illegal drugs
racketeer - someone who commits crimes for profit (especially one who obtains money by fraud or extortion)
raper, rapist - someone who forces another to have sexual intercourse
habitual criminal, recidivist, repeater - someone who is repeatedly arrested for criminal behavior (especially for the same criminal behavior)
scofflaw - one who habitually ignores the law and does not answer court summonses
contrabandist, moon curser, moon-curser, runner, smuggler - someone who imports or exports without paying duties
stealer, thief - a criminal who takes property belonging to someone else with the intention of keeping it or selling it
traitor, treasonist - someone who betrays his country by committing treason
law offender, lawbreaker, violator - someone who violates the law

malefactor

noun
One who commits a crime:
Law: felon.
Translations

malefactor

[ˈmælɪfæktəʳ] N (frm) → malhechor(a) m/f

malefactor

nÜbeltäter(in) m(f), → Missetäter(in) m(f)

malefactor

[ˈmælɪˌfæktəʳ] n (frm) → malfattore m
References in periodicals archive ?
Perhaps, organized crime is viewed as more harmful because those other illegal acts might affect our nonresident welfare more than would the malefactions of fraudsters.
In these circumstances, Washington has inadvertently skidded into the malefactions of imperialism, the US has come to be characterized as the National Security State, or the Warfare State, and the powers of the President have expanded to overshadow those of the other two branches of government.
Perhaps, though, for a public weary of corporate malefactions, giving without receiving will turn out to be a good thing.
After extensive archival research on players from 1900 through 1992, one study cites 20 sex scandals, numerous gambling malefactions, 31 individuals banned for life, 63 players who were "named, arrested, treated, or have admitted to having used cocaine," and numerous drinking problems.