malic


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Related to malic: malic acid, Maleic

malic

(ˈmælɪk)
adj
(Elements & Compounds) of or relating to malic acid or anything derived from it

mal•ic

(ˈmæl ɪk, ˈmeɪ lɪk)

adj.
of or derived from malic acid.
[1790–1800; < French malique < Latin māl(um) apple + French -ique -ic]
References in periodicals archive ?
Food acidulants such as acetic acid, citric acid, lactic acid, malic acid, and phosphoric acid have preservative, stabilizing, antimicrobial, and pH-regulating properties that increase the shelf life of food and beverages.
Malic acid and glucose can be separated at quantifiable levels, close to baseline separation, which has been a problem in the past.
AFTER twenty years of haggling, a deal on wine has been reached by the European Union (EU) and the United States under which the EU will accept existing American wine-making practices such as adding malic acid to correct deficient acidity (common in California) and the use of oak wood chips during ageing.
This report analyzes the worldwide markets for Malic Acid in Metric Tons.
Scientists at the University of Arkansas have examined an electrostatic spray containing tartaric and malic acids and grape seed extract as an intervention technology for spinach.
Up to seven parameters are measured: sugar, pH, total acid, glucose/fructose, malic acid, ethanol, volatile acid and colour.
The edible films in these experiments incorporate malic acid, an organic acid that is present in apples.
THE EUROPEAN Union (EU) Council of Ministers has extended until September 2005 Argentina's provisional authorisation to use the additive malic acid in wine sold into the EU.
The effects of electric field strength, the number of pulses and the total treatment time were studied on the organoleptic properties, color, flavor, malic acid content, vitamin C content, nonenzymatic browning index, hydroxymethylfurfurol content, microbial condition and shelf life of apple juices.
Malic acids are going to be up; all this means good, crisp flavors.
Some organic acids are naturally present in foods, such as the citric acid in oranges, malic acid in apples, and, as a result of fermentation, the lactic acid in yogurt.