malison

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mal·i·son

 (măl′ĭ-sən, -zən)
n.
A curse.

[Middle English malisoun, from Old French maleiçon, from Latin maledictiō, maledictiōn-, from maledictus, past participle of maledīcere, to speak ill, curse; see maledict.]

malison

(ˈmælɪzən; -sən)
n
an archaic or poetic word for curse
[C13: via Old French from Latin maledictiō malediction]

mal•i•son

(ˈmæl ə zən, -sən)

n.
Archaic. a curse.
[1200–50; < Old French maleison < Latin maledictiōnem, acc. of maledictiō malediction]
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malison

noun
Archaic. A denunciation invoking a wish or threat of evil or injury:
References in classic literature ?
A hide of land I give to thee in my steads of Walbrugham, from me and mine to thee and thine aye and for ever; and God's malison on his head who this gainsays!''
1) On the Labdacidae I see descending Woe upon woe; from days of old some god Laid on the race a malison, and his rod Scourges each age with sorrows never ending.
As one Scottish verse goes: "Malisons, malisons, mair than ten, That harry our Lady of Heaven's wren.' Except it seems on St Stephen's Day!