malleability


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mal·le·a·ble

 (măl′ē-ə-bəl)
adj.
1. Capable of being shaped or formed, as by hammering or pressure: a malleable metal.
2. Easily controlled or influenced: "The British [rulers] ... had favoured the brother who struck them as altogether more amiable, a more malleable, more temperate man" (Paul Scott).
3.
a. Able to adjust to changing circumstances; adaptable: a malleable leader unafraid to compromise.
b. Capable of being changed or adjusted to meet particular or varied needs: the malleable rhythms of jazz.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Medieval Latin malleābilis, from malleāre, to hammer, from Latin malleus, hammer; see melə- in Indo-European roots.]

mal′le·a·bil′i·ty, mal′le·a·ble·ness n.
mal′le·a·bly adv.
Synonyms: malleable, ductile, plastic, pliable, pliant
These adjectives mean capable of being shaped, bent, or drawn out: malleable metals such as gold and silver; ductile copper; a plastic substance such as wax; soaked the leather to make it pliable; pliant molten glass.

malleability

the property of a substance that makes it capable of being extended or shaped by hammering or by pressure from rollers. — malleable, adj.
See also: Materials, Properties of
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.malleability - the property of being physically malleablemalleability - the property of being physically malleable; the property of something that can be worked or hammered or shaped without breaking
physical property - any property used to characterize matter and energy and their interactions
ductileness, ductility - the malleability of something that can be drawn into threads or wires or hammered into thin sheets
flexibility, flexibleness - the property of being flexible; easily bent or shaped
unmalleability - a lack of malleability

malleability

noun
Translations
maleabilitate

malleability

[ˌmælɪəˈbɪlɪtɪ] Nmaleabilidad f

malleability

nFormbarkeit f; (of clay, wax also)Geschmeidigkeit f
References in classic literature ?
I saw another at work to calcine ice into gunpowder; who likewise showed me a treatise he had written concerning the malleability of fire, which he intended to publish.
Time out of mind, such malleability has been the cross of the Magdalenes.
Nonetheless, Neely succeeds in revitalizing the discussion on American politics in the Civil War era, and demonstrates the malleability of the border between mid-nineteenth-century politics and the public and private domain.
The three leading banks in Lebanon have managed to ride the wave of political and economic uncertainty in the country and have proven their malleability in coping with crisis.
Instead of master narratives, he offers material and formal displacements in which the malleability of space can be perceived viscerally rather than logically.
In brief, this is an essential book, both as a work of art and a treatise on the malleability of the body--a concept that has only become more relevant since Bellmer's passing.
The solitary vibrations mimic structural defects that affect crystal malleability, Manley says.
While obviously not a complete replica of the French model, these levels of institutions defined by their durability and malleability and their mutual influences on each other and local actors all seem to reflect the same logic which dominated French historical writing for many years.
That malleability, known as synaptic plasticity, is believed to be the fundamental basis of memory, learning, and brain development.
This new way of thinking about Venice provides important insights that suggest that the city may have maintained relative peace and order, not because it was a tightly-defined, hierarchical society, as the myth suggests, but rather because of its malleability, diversity, and adaptability, the fuzziness of its social boundaries.
Aluminium's lightness and malleability suggested the idea of treating the covering as fabric capable of billowing out of the grid.