malleable


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mal·le·a·ble

 (măl′ē-ə-bəl)
adj.
1. Capable of being shaped or formed, as by hammering or pressure: a malleable metal.
2. Easily controlled or influenced: "The British [rulers] ... had favoured the brother who struck them as altogether more amiable, a more malleable, more temperate man" (Paul Scott).
3.
a. Able to adjust to changing circumstances; adaptable: a malleable leader unafraid to compromise.
b. Capable of being changed or adjusted to meet particular or varied needs: the malleable rhythms of jazz.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Medieval Latin malleābilis, from malleāre, to hammer, from Latin malleus, hammer; see melə- in Indo-European roots.]

mal′le·a·bil′i·ty, mal′le·a·ble·ness n.
mal′le·a·bly adv.
Synonyms: malleable, ductile, plastic, pliable, pliant
These adjectives mean capable of being shaped, bent, or drawn out: malleable metals such as gold and silver; ductile copper; a plastic substance such as wax; soaked the leather to make it pliable; pliant molten glass.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

malleable

(ˈmælɪəbəl)
adj
1. (esp of metal) able to be worked, hammered, or shaped under pressure or blows without breaking
2. able to be influenced; pliable or tractable
[C14: via Old French from Medieval Latin malleābilis, from Latin malleus hammer]
ˌmalleaˈbility, ˈmalleableness n
ˈmalleably adv
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

mal•le•a•ble

(ˈmæl i ə bəl)

adj.
1. capable of being extended or shaped, as by hammering or by pressure.
2. adaptable; tractable: a malleable personality.
[1350–1400; < Medieval Latin malleābilis=malle(āre) to hammer + -ābilis -able]
mal′le•a•bly, adv.
mal`le•a•bil′i•ty, mal′le•a•ble•ness, n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

mal·le·a·ble

(măl′ē-ə-bəl)
Capable of being shaped or formed in its solid state, especially by pressure or hammering. Gold is the most malleable substance known.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.malleable - easily influenced
manipulable, tractable - easily managed (controlled or taught or molded); "tractable young minds"; "the natives...being...of an intelligent tractable disposition"- Samuel Butler
2.malleable - capable of being shaped or bent or drawn outmalleable - capable of being shaped or bent or drawn out; "ductile copper"; "malleable metals such as gold"; "they soaked the leather to made it pliable"; "pliant molten glass"; "made of highly tensile steel alloy"
formed - having or given a form or shape
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

malleable

adjective
1. manageable, adaptable, compliant, impressionable, pliable, tractable, biddable, governable, like putty in your hands She was young enough to be malleable.
2. workable, soft, plastic, tensile, ductile Silver is the most malleable of all metals.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

malleable

adjective
1. Capable of being shaped, bent, or drawn out, as by hammering or pressure:
3. Capable of adapting or being adapted:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
mukautuvainen
maleabil

malleable

[ˈmælɪəbl] ADJmaleable, dúctil
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

malleable

[ˈmæliəbəl] adj
[substance] → malléable
[person] → influençable
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

malleable

adjformbar (also fig), → weich; (of clay, wax also)geschmeidig
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

malleable

[ˈmælɪəbl] adjmalleabile
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

mal·le·a·ble

a. maleable.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in classic literature ?
This metal, in fact, is the most tenacious, the most ductile, and the most malleable, and consequently suitable for all moulding operations; and when smelted with pit coal, is of superior quality for all engineering works requiring great resisting power, such as cannon, steam boilers, hydraulic presses, and the like.
In effect, a large compass of beautiful thought and expression, from poetry old and new, have become to him matter malleable anew for a further and finer reach of literary art.
When the substance is in a proper state for the next process, it betrays evidences of incipient decomposition; the fibres are relaxed and softened, and rendered perfectly malleable. The different strips are now extended, one by one, in successive layers, upon some smooth surface--generally the prostrate trunk of a cocoanut tree--and the heap thus formed is subjected, at every new increase, to a moderate beating, with a sort of wooden mallet, leisurely applied.
The characters of the narrative would not be warmed and rendered malleable by any heat that I could kindle at my intellectual forge.
Stockton went on to dominate the first half but were unable to add to their score as a Malleable defence backed up by their man of the match goalkeeper Brian Chambers held firm.
GM's Saginaw Malleable plant, however, could face closure after a 2003 GM contract with the United Auto Workers removed the foundry from the protected-plant list.
The velocity of the rotation also interfered with one's perception of the stability of the architectural elements: The column, for example, seemed to become a malleable structure, like clay manipulated by a ceramist.
Once the polymer has set and cured, hardening into a malleable plastic, the researchers can remove the patterned microstructure from the master and reuse the mold.
The Malleable fared better on their own pitch in Division One as they produced a regal performance to drub Billingham The Kings 5-1.
Occupational Injury Rates per 100 Full Time Workers Total OSHA Recordable Injury & Illness Cases SIC (1) Code 2002 2001 All Manufacturing -- 7.2 8.1 Primary Metal Industries 33 10.3 10.7 Iron & Steel Foundries 332 15.8 16.7 Gray & Ductile Iron 3321 17.4 18.9 Malleable 3322 18.3 11.2 Steel Investment 3324 9.8 11.5 Steel, n.e.c.
(I can't help wondering what would happen to Kersels's art if he lost weight; unlike gender or race as commonly conceived, the supersized body is, potentially at least, something malleable, reducible, an entity but not exactly an identity.) The art produced by this body is accordingly a little tough and a little tender: In his earlier series of photographs, "Tossing a Friend," 1996, in which he launches much smaller female friends into the air, you can sense, b ehind the smiles of the participants, the unfulfilled longings of awkward adolescence.