malodorousness


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mal·o·dor·ous

 (măl-ō′dər-əs)
adj.
Having a bad odor; foul.

mal·o′dor·ous·ly adv.
mal·o′dor·ous·ness n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.malodorousness - the attribute of having a strong offensive smellmalodorousness - the attribute of having a strong offensive smell
aroma, odor, olfactory property, odour, smell, scent - any property detected by the olfactory system
B.O., body odor, body odour - malodorousness resulting from a failure to bathe
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
'If the public sensitize in that regard, the garbage and malodorousness can be controlled and the spread of diseases can be prevented besides breeding of mosquitoes and other insects', he added.
He said if the cleanliness of these nullahs is carried out on a regular basis, the garbage and malodorousness can be controlled and the spread of diseases can be prevented besides breeding of mosquitoes and other insects.
Director Sanitation Sardar Khan Zimri told the Sanitation Directorate to take effective steps for the cleanliness of nullahs in a well planned manner as the sewerage lines are causing malodorousness whereas throwing of plastic bags and other solid waste results in the blockage of the smooth flow of nullah water.
Leprous lesions were labeled stains, blemishes, or spots, and manifested qualities of rotting, foulness, or malodorousness. The pervasive use of the word "foul"--which occurs twelve times in Hamlet also helped perpetuate negative stereotypes about those afflicted.
(6) Likewise, as the narrator confirms, London's brilliant surface cannot "cover up this malodorousness, the swamp that lies beneath the pleasure gardens, and the miasma percolating up through the run-down ornamental terraces" (2003: 62).