malposition


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mal·po·si·tion

 (măl′pə-zĭsh′ən)
n.
An abnormal position, as of an organ or a body part.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

malposition

(ˌmælpəˈzɪʃən)
n
(Pathology) abnormal position of a bodily part
malposed adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

mal•po•si•tion

(ˌmæl pəˈzɪʃ ən)

n.
faulty or wrong position, esp. of a fetus in the uterus.
[1830–40]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.malposition - faulty positionmalposition - faulty position      
spatial relation, position - the spatial property of a place where or way in which something is situated; "the position of the hands on the clock"; "he specified the spatial relations of every piece of furniture on the stage"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

mal·po·si·tion

n. posición inadecuada.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
WHAT IS YOUR APPROACH TO THE PERSISTENT OCCIPUT POSTERIOR MALPOSITION?
The average rate of complications following CTI varies from 5% to 10%,[1],[2],[3],[4] whereas immediate complications during the insertion are rare.[1],[4] In addition, the cumulative rates of early (≤24 h) and late (>24 h) complications following CTI are approximately 3% and 8%, respectively.[1],[2],[3],[5] Common CTI-related complications in the early period are drainage malposition and pneumothorax, whereas those in the late period include tube dislodgement, kinking, and infection.[2],[5]
KEYWORDS: Malposition, Dialysis catheter, Hepatic vein.
In 1954, Mead defined an impacted tooth as a tooth which is prevented from erupting into position because of malposition, lack of space or other impediments.
The aetiology of gingival recession is multifactorial.3 Several factors may play a role in gingival recession development, such as excessive or inadequate teeth brushing, destructive periodontal disease, tooth malposition, high muscle attachment and occlusal trauma.4 There remains a significant correlation between the gingival recession and some risk factors such as cigarette smoking, use of abrasive tooth powder, oral hygiene practices, braces, and occlusal injury.5 Gingival recession appears as a wedge-shaped lesion on buccal surface of the teeth, and it can occur on any tooth surface.
The other causes of CRI in our study included electrode array extrusion (3 ears) and electrode array malposition (3 ears, 2 in hypotympanum and 1 in Eustachian tube) as shown in Figure 2.
There were no early complications such as bowel perforation, stent expansion failure, and malposition, and there was no procedure-related mortality.
The insertion time; incidence of tube malposition (supine and lateral); intra-operative hypoxia and hypercapnia were recorded.
The occurrence of NGT placement failure and malposition, hypoxemia, and regurgitation was addressed in the selected studies.
Electrode malposition, a bane to the electrocardiographer, is common but rarely as egregious as in Figure 1.1 2 1 2 3 No seasoned ECG technician would have made such an error.
As the tube malposition is associated with hypoxemia, pneumothorax, right upper lobe collapse and death, rapid confirmation of proper tube placement is critical (3).