malt liquor


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Related to malt liquor: Malt beverage

malt liquor

n.
1. Strong, inexpensive beer, especially when sold in large bottles.
2. A fermented beverage made with malt.

malt liquor

n
(Brewing) any alcoholic drink brewed from malt

malt′ liq`uor


n.
beer having a relatively high alcohol content.
[1685–1695]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.malt liquor - a lager of high alcohol contentmalt liquor - a lager of high alcohol content; by law it is considered too alcoholic to be sold as lager or beer
lager beer, lager - a general term for beer made with bottom fermenting yeast (usually by decoction mashing); originally it was brewed in March or April and matured until September
malt - a cereal grain (usually barley) that is kiln-dried after having been germinated by soaking in water; used especially in brewing and distilling
References in classic literature ?
What with the nursing of a healthy babby, and the reflections upon your cruel conduct, four pints of malt liquor a day is hardly able to sustain her.
but I never knew her do it when company was present, at which time you may freely trust her with wines, spirits, or malt liquors.
27, alleging that kids even had access to the Pepsi machine, which replaced soda with malt liquor over the past few months.
Recent research suggests that malt liquor drinkers are more likely to be homeless, unemployed, and receiving public assistance than regular beer or hard liquor drinkers (Bluthenthal, Brown-Taylor, Guzman-Becerra, and Robinson, 2005).
The merchants, most of them convenience store owners, have agreed to indefinitely stop selling fortified malt liquor with alcohol content of 8 percent or more beginning June 14, authorities said.
Wine coolers, high proof liquor, malt liquor, and fortified wines have become increasingly popular with adolescents (Boys, Marsden, Stillwell, Hutchings, Griffiths & Farrell, 2003; McBride, Midford, Farringdon, & Phillips, 2000), and in recent years, the alcohol industry has intensified the development and marketing of these types of drinks to the youth market (Center on Alcohol Monitoring and Youth, 2002; Hughes, MacKintosh, Hastings, Wheeler, Watson, & Inglis, 1997; Jackson, Hastings, Wheeler, Eadie, & MacKintosh, 2000; Martin et al.
The 1994 Minnesota Legislature heard their concerns and passed a law that revoked state approval of "brand label registration" for any malt liquor that "states or implies in a false or misleading manner a connection with an actual living or dead American Indian leader.
In 1992, for example, the BATF threatened to rescind its approval of labeling for Crazy Horse malt liquor after then-Surgeon General Antonia Novello called the name "an insensitive and malicious marketing ploy" aimed at appealing to Native Americans.
Among malt beverages, certain brands of malt liquor were also over-represented in the emergency room compared to their presence in the general population, according to lead researcher David Jernigan, PhD, MA, associate professor in the Department of Health, Behavior and Society at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.
With results like these, why not make the ban on cheap, high-alcohol malt liquor wider and permanent?
What would his reaction be if he could see the malt liquor bottle that now bears his name and a stereotypical likeness of an American Indian?