mammet


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mammet

(ˈmæmɪt)
n
another word for maumet
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References in periodicals archive ?
Uzbekistan's Eldor Shomurodov takes a shot at goal as Turkmenistan's goalkeeper Mammet Orazmuhammedow (right) looks on.
Then there are unfamiliar words such as 'leet' which was a court of justice or 'mammet' which meant puppet.
Indeed, such vernacular romances represented devil images of Muhammad's idol, which are repeated in the use of the term 'mammet' in Chaucer, Shakespeare, and Ben Johnson.
In terms of specific directors, Bielinsky acknowledges the influence of Hitchcock and Mammet (Lerer 120).
"Turk." Noteworthy, the names "mammet" the distortion of the Prophet Mohammed's name and "Turk" also used to refer in England during the 16th and 17th centuries to a scarecrow or a 'hideous image to frighten children; a bugbear." See Oxford English Dictionary Online, Draft Revision, March 2001, s.v.
The word "mawmet" or "mammet" enters the English language from Old French as a corruption of the name Mahomet (Mohammad).
This is no world To play with mammets and to tilt with lips.
William Turner's Herbal (1562) talks of `little puppets and mammets which come to be sold in England in boxes'.