managed care


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

man·aged care

(măn′ĭjd)
n.
Any arrangement for health care in which an organization, such as an HMO, another type of doctor-hospital network, or an insurance company, acts an intermediary between the person seeking care and the physician.

man′aged care′


n.
a health plan or system that seeks to control medical costs by contracting with a network of providers and by requiring preauthorization for visits to specialists.
[1985–90]
Translations
zdravotní péče
egészségvédelem
zdravotná starostlivosť

managed care

n (US) atención (médica) administrada, atención médica gestionada con fines de contener costos
References in periodicals archive ?
And for a long time managed care delivered on the promise.
IF YOU'RE LOOKING FOR the next iteration of managed care, you've come to the wrong place.
The term managed care connotes a commitment to improving the delivery of health care.
The "do over" theme seemed to permeate the 1999 meeting of the American Public Health Association (APHA), held in Chicago in early November, especially in discussions of managed care and its application to long-term care.
The Managed Care Information Center (MCIC), Robert K Jenkins, publisher, has launched Managed Care Executive Information Service--an online service "specifically designed for time-pressed managed care market researchers and executives in health and managed care organizations, pharmaceutical firms, healthcare technology companies serving the managed care industry, and others studying the growing managed care market," Jenkins says.
Managed care brings down traditional Medicare spending
Kongstvedt (1989) stated that corporations have addressed the escalation in cost by reducing coverage and/or offering creative benefits packages such as managed care arrangements (e.
Just as the relatively new managed-care industry is taking tips from other businesses, so other businesses are learning from managed care.
However, if primary physician groups receive fixed payments under managed care contracts, the cash method may be inappropriate for reporting a group's financial performance and managing a practice.
These laws, along with mandated-benefits legislation, reduce the effectiveness of managed care by limiting the plan's ability to control quality, cost and utilization.

Full browser ?