managed currency


Also found in: Financial.

managed currency

n
(Currencies) a currency that is subject to governmental control with respect to the amount in circulation and the rate of exchange with other currencies
References in periodicals archive ?
The midpoint for the tightly managed currency was set at 6.
The People's Bank of China set the midpoint for the tightly managed currency at 6.
Our findings suggest that actively managed currency strategies can significantly reduce volatility and minimize drawdowns in portfolios, and that viewing risk dynamics as a trading signal can generate consistent alpha over time," they explained.
Historically, businesses have usually managed currency and interest rate risks separately from commodity risks because their treasury and procurement functions have operated separately.
The yen is a managed currency and Japan is a managed economy.
We have an approach for having a managed currency exchange rate vis a vis the US dollar, because Lebanon is essentially dollarized and therefore we have prevented speculation in the currency and eliminated a lot of the distortions that could have happened because of speculation especially when we have incidents in the country that can create fear for depositors.
A few emerging markets are running tightly managed currency regimes," said US Treasury secretary Tim Geithner at this weekend's meeting of the International Monetary Fund in Washington, clearly referring to China's continued 'Dollar-peg' strategy for keeping its exports competitive via the exchange rate.
Inconsistency in exchange rate policies is the most important problem in the international monetary system, with some countries running tightly managed currency regimes that harm the global economy, U.
AaUS calls for exporting nations to consume more will shift the spotlight back toward China's managed currency and its whopping trade surplus after.
Merk is offering investors an opportunity to add managed currency exposure to their portfolios" said Axel Merk, the President and CIO of Merk Investments.
Dubai: The International Monetary Fund (IMF) said yesterday that a managed currency float in the Gulf could allow greater monetary independence to control inflation and facilitate real exchange rate adjustment to real shocks while, at the same time, suggesting a more flexible exchange rate regime "as a longer-term possibility".
We want an end to a managed currency in China that hurts us," European Union trade commissioner Peter Mandelson said, highlighting some issues top US and EU officials will discuss today during the first meeting of the new Transatlantic Economic Council.