managerialism

(redirected from managerialist)

managerialism

(ˌmænɪˈdʒɪərɪəˌlɪzəm)
n
(Industrial Relations & HR Terms) the application of managerial techniques of businesses to the running of other organizations, such as the civil service or local authorities
ˌmanaˈgerialist n
References in periodicals archive ?
This meta-analysis examines the empirical evidence in support of the agency argument that CEO pay will be linked to firm performance outcomes and the managerialist assertions that CEO pay will be largely decoupled from performance and tied more closely to scale of operations.
The assumption of the managerialist reforms is that they can make the labor intensive instruments more effective, while the latter may depend upon more ex post forms of evaluation and assessment.
The kibbutz became increasingly centralised, institutionalised and managerialist (266-269).
Some of the leading writers on power [Clegg 1995; Giddens 1985] indicate that one way to view the literature in this area is to look at it as reflecting a conflict between two "voices": the Marxist, or critical voice, and the functionalist, or managerialist voice.
The research, sponsored by the Home Office, and much in line with current managerialist interests there, was specifically concerned with the cost/savings effects of the new power.
Indeed, the best known sectional managerialist work, James Burnham's The Managerial Revolution, published in 1941, went even further, arguing that with their control of the economic resources of society, managers would emerge as a new ruling class and that both capitalism and socialism would be superseded by a new "managerial society.
The earlier paper, entitled "Two cheers for empowerment: some critical reflections" (Collins, 1997), might be thought of as an attempt, both to challenge the emerging and increasingly dominant managerialist rhetoric on empowerment at work, and as an attempt to refocus and rededicate OD academics and practitioners to the core values of the OD movement.
In arguing for a closer examination of words such as "information", Winograd and Flores argue that "we find ourselves being drawn into inquiries about basic human phenomena that have been called things like `intelligence', `language' and `rationality'" [14] This is heady stuff, and raises issues which are difficult to teach within the straight-jacket of conventional subjects, especially when these are managerialist in orientation.
The first three critiques are derived from a traditional managerialist framework.
The Joint Public Accounts Committee investigating the selection and development of senior civil servants in the early 1980s considered that the reign of the amateur-type public manager must come to an end and concluded accordingly, very much in a managerialist tone[32, p.
The GATT provides a better laboratory for evaluating the managerialist claims about how compliance can best be improved than the Washington Treaty because unlike the latter, the GATT has evolved.
Librarianship in the United States, in the main forsaking critical debate over theoretical models, has entwined itself in a managerialist "cult of utilitarian and pragmatic thinking"(18) - and so the profession can scarcely be located anywhere on the cultural agenda of the day, however that might be defined.