managing

(redirected from managings)

man·age

 (măn′ĭj)
v. man·aged, man·ag·ing, man·ag·es
v.tr.
1.
a. To have charge of; direct or administer: manage a company; manage a portfolio of assets. See Synonyms at conduct.
b. To exert control over; regulate or limit toward a desired end: manage the news to minimize political repercussions; managed smokestack emissions.
c. To direct or supervise (employees or other staff): She manages 20 people in the department.
d. To act as the manager of (a performer, for example).
2. To succeed in accomplishing, achieving, or producing, especially with difficulty: managed to get a promotion; managed a polite goodbye.
3. To succeed in coping or dealing with: a drug that improves patients' ability to manage their disease.
v.intr.
1. To direct or conduct business affairs.
2. To continue to get along; carry on; cope: learning how to manage on my own.

[Italian maneggiare, from Vulgar Latin *manidiāre, from Latin manus, hand; see man- in Indo-European roots.]

managing

(ˈmænɪdʒɪŋ)
adj
(Industrial Relations & HR Terms) having administrative control or authority: a managing director.
Translations

managing

[ˈmænɪdʒɪŋ] CPD managing director N (Brit) → director(a) m/f gerente
managing editor Ndirector(a) m/f editorial
managing partner Nsocio mf gerente
References in classic literature ?
He asserted his position by calling the managing clerk Goodworthy.
The way in which he had been managing his land revolted him and had lost all attraction for him.
What the Managing Committee of the Duskydale Institution thought of the change in me, I cannot imagine.
She has never been permitted to call me anything but Captain; and on the rare occasions since our union, when circumstances may have obliged her to address me by letter, her opening form of salutation has been rigidly restricted to 'Dear Sir.' Accept these trifling domestic particulars as suggesting hints which may be useful to you in managing Mrs.
As in all arts which are brought to perfection it is necessary that they should have their proper instruments if they would complete their works, so is it in the art of managing a family: now of instruments some of them are alive, others inanimate; thus with respect to the pilot of the ship, the tiller is without life, the sailor is alive; for a servant is as an instrument in many arts.
During our journey he made me observe the several methods used by farmers in managing their lands, which to me were wholly unaccountable; for, except in some very few places, I could not discover one ear of corn or blade of grass.
In managing their canoes they kneel two and two along the bottom, sitting on their heels, and wielding paddles from four to five feet long, while one sits on the stern and steers with a paddle of the same kind.
The delighted builder then offered his services in providing a suitable crew for the little vessel, but this Dantes declined with many thanks, saying he was accustomed to cruise about quite alone, and his principal pleasure consisted in managing his yacht himself; the only thing the builder could oblige him in would be to contrive a sort of secret closet in the cabin at his bed's head, the closet to contain three divisions, so constructed as to be concealed from all but himself.
They wished to be taken for men of the world, and could have passed anywhere for the managing clerks of a city firm.
'--How can you talk about their managing their little means?