mandarinism

mandarinism

(ˈmændərɪnˌɪzəm)
n
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a Chinese mandarin government
References in periodicals archive ?
154-5) both invoke the legacy of Confucianism, and Reis that of 'Mandarinism' (pp.
Taken together, Wilamowitz's and Jaeger's traditional philology amounted to a last act in German Mandarinism to which Grassi reacted with the new hermeneutics apprehended in Heidegger's seminars.
And those who disdained free verse would always be open to accusations of elitism, mandarinism. Open form was like a common ground on which all might graze their cattle--it was not to be closed in by usurping landlords.
By saying that Brannigan avoids connotative implications, I do not mean that he does not try to exercise astute hermeneusis of such labels; indeed, his declaration that "the new label [cultural poetics] is a retreat into a more hermetic position in relation to literature than was evident in the same critical practice under the rubric of new historicism' (93) marks a useful effort at decrying the competing levels of hermeticism (by which he means not "mandarinism" but critical attention to "closed" structural systems) in modern theory.
The reason may be that ethnography takes too long for the publish-or-perish Mandarinism of business schools (Stewart, 1995).
The war ended, and cadre morale began to sag; performance declined; corruption crept in, along with rising "mandarinism" (i.e., selfish, imperious misuse of office).
The notion of the scholar as culture-bearer was, of course, no novelty to these German academics, for they had learned their trade in the Mandarin culture of the German university, in which culture had its special realm protected from the forces of politics.(49) In essence, the German refugee scholars offered Mandarinism for export.