licensure

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Also found in: Medical.
Related to mandatory licensure: institutional licensure

li·cen·sure

 (lī′sən-shər, -sho͝or′)
n.
The act or an instance of granting a license, usually to practice a profession.

licensure

(ˈlaɪsənʃə)
n
the act of conferring a licence, esp one that permits the practice of a profession

li•cen•sure

(ˈlaɪ sən ʃər, -ˌʃʊər)

n.
the granting of licenses, esp. to engage in professional practice.
[1840–50]
Translations

li·cen·sure

n. autorización, permiso legal para ejercer la medicina o ejecutar actos sólo permitidos a médicos o personal médico.
References in periodicals archive ?
Operators of sober living facilities are eagerly awaiting further clarification on whether voluntary and mandatory licensure requirements will be upheld if they are challenged as violations of federal laws like the ADA and FHA.
Mandatory licensure elevates the perception of the profession.
In fact, mandatory licensure for nurses practicing in Tennessee did not pass until 1967!
In Chapter 9 of Capitalism and Freedom, Milton Friedman discussed how government certification (sometimes called "voluntary licensure") and mandatory licensure function as alternative mechanisms for solving the asymmetric information problem about professional quality.
The history of nurse practice acts is grouped usually into three phases: (a) the origin of basic registration laws (19001938); (b) the expectation of mandatory licensure for all those who nurse for hire (1938-1971); and (c) modifications in NPAs to include role expansion for registered nurses (1971-current).
If your company only educates to fulfill mandatory licensure requirements, you are missing potential opportunities to grow staff which can dramatically impact the perceptions of long-term care and deliver on the promises of culture change.
We urge Oregonians to contact their state representatives and support mandatory licensure for midwives.
The bill was the first to include a definition of professional nursing and a mandatory licensure provision for both professional and practical nurses.
Additionally, I discuss 35 years of literature that presents the 2 theories behind the use of mandatory licensure for professionals.
For a couple of decades, we've witnessed the push for state-by-state, mandatory licensure come and go, with the effort usually receding due to a stellar job of self-regulation from various professional organizations, universities and institute programs.
Nursing regulation changed dramatically beginning in 1938 when New York became the first state to pass a mandatory licensure law.
These papers compare two forms of professional regulation: on the one hand, a strong form of regulation (licensure, or licensing, that is also sometimes called "mandatory licensure") that implies that no one can enter the market and exert the profession without having the license and, on the other hand, a lighter form of regulation (certification, also called voluntary licensing) in which no one is prevented to practice a profession--certification establishes no entry and not being certified does not prevent the exercise of the profession.
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