mandibular

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man·di·ble

 (măn′də-bəl)
n.
1. The lower jaw of a vertebrate animal.
2. Either the upper or lower part of the beak in birds.
3. Any of various mouth organs of invertebrates used for seizing and biting food, especially either of a pair of such organs in insects and other arthropods.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Late Latin mandibula, from Latin mandere, to chew.]

man·dib′u·lar (-dĭb′yə-lər) adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.mandibular - relating to the lower jawmandibular - relating to the lower jaw    
References in periodicals archive ?
Mandible is the second most common fractured bone 2 and these mandibular fracture account for 78% of the panfacial trauma.4 Out of all the treatment modalities of mandibular trauma, maxillomandibular fixation is the most basic and time tested.
Samieirad et al .[41] reported a case of a 39-year-old female who presented with symptoms of GBS 3 days after surgical fixation of her mandibular fracture.
[26] The body of the mandible was the most common mandibular fracture site.
Surgical correction of mandibular fracture in a mare by interdental cerclage: a case report
Patients and Methods: The patients who presented with isolated mandibular fracture were selected according to inclusion criteria.
"We demonstrate that patient- and site-specific 3-D-printed short-segment templates can be created within the timeframe required for mandibular fracture repair," the authors write.
However, some studies indicated the mandibular fracture as the most common facial bone fracture [2, 3].
Imamoglu, "Treatment of a mandibular fracture with biodegradable plate in an infant: report of a case," Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology, Oral Radiology, and Endodontology, vol.
She reported that she had sought another service, in which the extraction was indicated in a hospital, under general anesthesia, with posterior internal fixation of the mandible with plates and screws due to the risk of mandibular fracture. Panoramic radiograph revealed partially erupted third molars compatible with taurodontism extending up to the base of the mandible (Figure 1).
One of the most devastating consequences of periodontal disease is pathological mandibular fracture. "In these cases, the bone of the lower jaw is so severely affected that it may break as a result light trauma or normal chewing behavior," Dr.
The conservation of the impacted teeth can lead to difficulties such as mandibular fracture, resorption of the root of the adjacent teeth, and associated pathologies (9).