symphysis

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Related to mandibular symphysis: Mental tubercle, dental arcade

sym·phy·sis

 (sĭm′fĭ-sĭs)
n. pl. sym·phy·ses (-sēz′)
1.
a. A growing together of bones originally separate, as of the two pubic bones or the two halves of the lower jawbone.
b. A line or junction thus formed.
c. An articulation in which bones are united by cartilage without a synovial membrane.
2. The coalescence of similar parts or organs.

[Greek sumphusis, from sumphuein, to cause to grow together : sun-, syn- + phuein, to cause to grow; see bheuə- in Indo-European roots.]

sym′phy·se′al (sĭm′fĭ-sē′əl), sym·phys′i·al (sĭm-fĭz′ē-əl) adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

symphysis

(ˈsɪmfɪsɪs)
n, pl -ses (-ˌsiːz)
1. (Anatomy) anatomy botany a growing together of parts or structures, such as two bony surfaces joined by an intermediate layer of fibrous cartilage
2. (Botany) anatomy botany a growing together of parts or structures, such as two bony surfaces joined by an intermediate layer of fibrous cartilage
3. (Anatomy) a line marking this growing together
4. (Pathology) pathol an abnormal adhesion of two or more parts or structures
[C16: via New Latin from Greek sumphusis, from sumphuein, from syn- + phuein to grow]
symphysial, symphyseal adj
symphystic, symˈphytic adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

sym•phy•sis

(ˈsɪm fə sɪs)

n., pl. -ses (-ˌsiz)
1. a joining of two complementary bones along the midline of the body, as at the halves of the lower jaw.
2. a similar joining of parts in a plant.
[1570–80; < New Latin < Greek sýmphysis a growing together =symphý(ein) to cause to grow together (sym- sym- + phýein to grow) + -sis -sis]
sym•phys′tic (-ˈfɪs tɪk) sym•phys′i•al (-ˈfɪz i əl) adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

symphysis

the growing together or the fixed or almost fixed union of two bones, as the two halves of the lower jaw. — symphyseal, symphysial, symphystic, adj.
See also: Bones
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

symphysis

A cartilaginous joint.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.symphysis - an abnormal adhesion of two or more structuressymphysis - an abnormal adhesion of two or more structures
adhesion - abnormal union of bodily tissues; most common in the abdomen
2.symphysis - a growing together of parts or structures
biological process, organic process - a process occurring in living organisms
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

sym·phy·sis

n. sínfisis, articulación en la cual las superficies óseas adyacentes se unen por un fibrocartílago;
pubic ______ púbica.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

symphysis

n (pl -ses) sínfisis f
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Various physiologic factors could affect the inclination of incisors such as age,7 inclination of the associated alveolar bone,3,10,11 cancellous bone thickness,3,11 depth of the mandibular symphysis,7,10 and perioral soft tissue structures.12-14 Incisors inclination also varies among different skeletal malocclusions.
The triangle is formed by joining the cephalometric points retrognathion (the most inferior, posterior point on the mandibular symphysis), hyoidale (the most superior, anterior point on the body of the hyoid bone) and C3 (the most anteroinferior point on the third cervical vertebra).
The mandible has the ability to flex inwards around the mandibular symphysis with changes in shape and decreases in mandibular arch width during opening and protrusion of the mandible.
The mandibular symphysis is wide and massive, with strong incisor alveolar process (Fig.
Both incisions were thus connected and continued down to the bone on the mandibular symphysis. Soft tissues were elevated and reflected caudally with a periosteal elevator on the mandibular symphysis to expose the normal bone.
The mass contained central soft area located on mandible, extending from rostral quarter of mandible to approximately 0.5 cm from the mandibular symphysis and from the gum-line to ventral aspect of mandible.
The morphology of the mandibular symphysis and the position of the lower incisors are crucial factors for the success of orthodontic treatment [1-6].
All 12 SBCs were located in the mandible, nine (75%) in the mandibular body, four of them being in the mandibular symphysis and five posterior to the mandibular body, two were in the mandible ramus, and one in the left mandibular condyle, as shown in Table 1.