mandolin


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man·do·lin

 (măn′də-lĭn′, măn′dl-ĭn)
n.
A small lutelike instrument with a typically pear-shaped body and a straight fretted neck, having usually four sets of paired strings tuned in unison or octaves.

[French mandoline, from Italian mandolino, diminutive of mandola, lute, from French mandore, from Late Latin pandūra, three-string lute, from Greek pandoura, perhaps of Mesopotamian origin.]

man′do·lin′ist n.

mandolin

(ˌmændəˈlɪn) or

mandoline

n
1. (Instruments) a plucked stringed instrument related to the lute, having four pairs of strings tuned in ascending fifths stretched over a small light body with a fretted fingerboard. It is usually played with a plectrum, long notes being sustained by the tremolo
2. (Cookery) a vegetable slicer consisting of a flat stainless-steel frame with adjustable cutting blades
[C18: via French from Italian mandolino, diminutive of mandora lute, ultimately from Greek pandoura musical instrument with three strings]
ˌmandoˈlinist n

man•do•lin

(ˈmæn dl ɪn, ˌmæn dlˈɪn)

n.
a stringed musical instrument with a pear-shaped wooden body and a fretted neck.
[1700–10; < Italian mandolino, diminutive of mandola, mandora, < Latin pandūra 3-stringed lute < Greek pandoûra; compare bandore]
man`do•lin′ist, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.mandolin - a stringed instrument related to the lute, usually played with a plectrummandolin - a stringed instrument related to the lute, usually played with a plectrum
chordophone - a stringed instrument of the group including harps, lutes, lyres, and zithers
fingerboard - a narrow strip of wood on the neck of some stringed instruments (violin or cello or guitar etc) where the strings are held against the wood with the fingers
mandola - an early type of mandolin
Translations
mandolína
mandolin
mandolin
mandólín
mandolīna
mandolină
mandolína
mandolina

mandolin

mandoline [ˈmændəlɪn] Nmandolina f, bandolina f (LAm)

mandolin

[ˌmændəˈlɪn] nmandoline f

mandolin(e)

nMandoline f

mandolin

mandoline [ˈmændəlɪn] nmandolino

mandolin,

mandoline

(ˈmӕndəlin) noun
a musical instrument similar to a guitar. He played a tune on the mandolin.
References in classic literature ?
He had been in Spain, and there had indulged in serenades and had made friends with a Spanish girl who played the mandolin. In Switzerland he had killed chamois.
Would it not be rash to conclude that there was no passion behind those sonnets to Delia which strike us as the thin music of a mandolin?
So when Langwidere sat in her easy chair and played soft melodies upon her mandolin, her form was mirrored hundreds of times, in walls and ceiling and floor, and whichever way the lady turned her head she could see and admire her own features.
On a table by her side lay a mandolin and an apple.
For he never travelled without a case of swords, with which he had fought many brilliant duels, or without a corresponding case for his mandolin, with which he had actually serenaded Miss Ethel Harrogate, the highly conventional daughter of a Yorkshire banker on a holiday.
There was the occasional sound of music, of mandolins, sufficiently removed to be an agreeable accompaniment rather than an interruption to the conversation.
They are a mandolin just waiting to be carved, adorned and stained or perhaps an elegant classical guitar eager to spring forth.
* STRUMMING ALONG: The Madeira Mandolin Orchestra is to play in Huddersfield, conducted by its musical director Eurico Martins (pictured left)
From the world of hard-driving bluegrass, Richard Collins proves his talents on mandolin and five string banjo.
So, if you have a chest of old mandolin music from your great-grandfather's collection moldering in the attic, or a Yizkor book that happens to mention the pieces that your great-uncle's mandolin orchestra played in Poland in 1933, drop Yonai a line.
"Bluegrass Jamming on Mandolin" is a handy, comprehensive Bluegrass mandolin textbook with audio CD for further instructions, examples and even Word files with tune lyrics for the songs covered in the book.
All right, it's been a while since they technically qualified as lads, but old friends Mac McHale and Emery Hutchins promise a Celtic-inspired evening of plaintive ballads, foot-stomping shout tunes, soaring mandolin solos, gospel sing-a-longs, traditional Irish tunes and story telling April 14 at the Grass Roots Coffeehouse in Northbridge.