mandylion


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mandylion

(mænˈdɪlɪən)
n
1. (Military) a loose garment formerly worn over armour
2. (Ecclesiastical Terms) a head-cloth or image bearing the face of Christ
References in periodicals archive ?
Este fue incapaz de reflejar en el lienzo el rostro de Cristo, quien deseando complacer al rey Abgar, tomo un pano (el mandylion) y se lo coloco sobre la faz, quedando impresas de manera milagrosa sus facciones.
Dello stesso taglio e il saggio di Francesca dell'Acqua (65-98) che studia le vicende dell'icona sacra, il Mandylion che da Edessa e arrivato a Genova, saggio solidissimo che rappresenta il ruolo della religione e dell'arte nell'incontro delle culture.
From the Mandylion of Edessa to the Shroud of Turin: The Metamorphosis and Manipulation of a Legend
(9) If we substitute for these Classical legends the Christian topoi of the Mandylion of Edessa, the Veil of Veronica, and Saint Luke painting the Theotokos, we find scriptural and theological grounds for the significance of the human body and its symbolic possibilities.
This brings us to the oddly named "Holy Mandylion" (man-dill-e-on), a long lost relic in Eastern Christianity, said to be the imprint of Jesus's face.
Objects include rare loans from the Vatican's Sancta Sanctorum, the Mandylion of Edessa, and the British Museum's bejewelled Holy Thorn reliquary, reminding us that this unique material history is both a proclamation of political power and an expression of Christian faith.
In this study, he sweeps away many of the misunderstandings about the image, also known as the Mandylion. Guscin has collected all major surviving mentions of the Mandylion in early Christianity as well as the probably apocryphal tale of its creation.
Visitors who saw "Legacy of the Popes" will remember the "Mandylion of Edessa," a third- to sixth-century treasure that is one of the earliest representations of Jesus.
The Greek text alluded to in Ramelli's note is the Acts of Thaddaeus where the cloth is also called a sindon, whereas other Greek witnesses to the cloth tradition call it a himation or rakos (thus John of Damascus), though it eventually ends up being called a mandylion, the term used when the relic was triumphantly transported to Constantinople in 944.
Drawings for the original basilica built by Emperor Constantine come next, followed by its treasures, a Bust of an Angel, a mosaic by Giotto, and the Mandylion of Edessa, a 5th-century linen painting of Our Lord surrounded by an elaborate gold and silver frame.
Course title: "The Mezuzah and the Mandylion: Acculturation and Inculturation - Folk Religion, Piety and Art in Judaism and Christianity"
The image was the mandylion, the head-cloth on which the image of Christ's face had appeared, through no human agency.