maned wolf

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maned′ wolf′


n.
a South American wild dog, Chrysocyon brachyurus, having a shaggy reddish coat.
[1900–05]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.maned wolf - reddish-grey wolf of southwestern North Americamaned wolf - reddish-grey wolf of southwestern North America
wolf - any of various predatory carnivorous canine mammals of North America and Eurasia that usually hunt in packs
Translations
Mähnenwolf
References in periodicals archive ?
As Fires rage across Brazil's Wild Heart, top predators like Jaguar, Caiman and Maned Wolves reign supreme
African elephants in Tanzania have seen numbers crash due to poaching, maned wolves in Brazil are threatened by grasslands being turned into farmland and European eels have declined due to disease, over-fishing and changes to their river habitats.
In the first phase, first the upper region of South America with Pantanal / Pampa and Patagonia of the existing Hacienda to be realized until the animal nursery: The coati received a new climbing structure; Maned wolves live in more rotation enclosures partially socialized with other animals, Tamanduas and armadillos have its own facility.
The authors found no studies or reports about unerupted teeth in maned wolves. A study involving eighty specimens of maned wolf (63 skulls and 17 living animals) suggested that the most common oral diseases include tooth wear (83.7%) and tooth fracture (54.4%) [6], but unerupted teeth were not reported.
However, we could not assert whether the maned wolves of the study area are natural hosts of this parasite or whether the infection is coming from sympatric domestic dogs and cats (exotics).
I also enjoy seeing other girls who write about things I care about, such as endangered animals like snow leopards, giant pandas, maned wolves, and river dolphins.
The IUCN identified four main threats to maned wolves: habitat reduction, road mortality, problems associated with domestic dogs, and hunting for folkloric medicine (Rodden et al., 2008), and Muir and Emmons (2012) add the threats of fire and climate change to the population in Bolivia.
Maned wolves (Chrysocyon brachyurus) contract giant kidney worms (Dioctophyma renale) as pups, and these parasites always infect the right kidney, leading to severe damage or destruction of the organ (17).
Hematology and blood chemistry parameters differ in free-ranging maned wolves (Chrysocyon brachyurus) living in the Serra da Canastra National Park versus adjacent farmlands, Brazil.