manger

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man·ger

 (mān′jər)
n.
A trough or an open box in which feed for livestock is placed.

[Middle English, from Old French mangeoire, from mangier, to eat, from Latin mandūcāre, from mandūcō, glutton, from mandere, to chew.]

manger

(ˈmeɪndʒə)
n
1. (Agriculture) a trough or box in a stable, barn, etc, from which horses or cattle feed
2. (Nautical Terms) nautical a basin-like construction in the bows of a vessel for catching water draining from an anchor rode or coming in through the hawseholes
[C14: from Old French maingeure food trough, from mangier to eat, ultimately from Latin mandūcāre to chew]

man•ger

(ˈmeɪn dʒər)

n.
a box or trough in a stable or barn from which livestock eat.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Old French mangëure, mainjure, derivative, with -ure -ure, of mangier to eat < Latin mandūcāre to chew, eat, v. derivative of mandūcus a gluttonous figure in farce]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.manger - a container (usually in a barn or stable) from which cattle or horses feedmanger - a container (usually in a barn or stable) from which cattle or horses feed
bunk, feed bunk - a long trough for feeding cattle
container - any object that can be used to hold things (especially a large metal boxlike object of standardized dimensions that can be loaded from one form of transport to another)

manger

noun trough, feeder, crib All the feed went into one manger.
Translations
مِذْوَد، مَعْلَف الدّابَّه
žlab
krybbe
jata
sile
válov
yemlik
馬槽马槽

manger

[ˈmeɪndʒəʳ] Npesebre m

manger

[ˈmeɪndʒər] n (= food trough) → mangeoire f

manger

nKrippe f

manger

[ˈmeɪndʒəʳ] nmangiatoia

manger

(ˈmeindʒə) noun
a box or trough in which food for horses and cattle is placed.
References in classic literature ?
Their mangers were placed circular in the middle of the room, and divided into several partitions, round which they sat on their haunches, upon bosses of straw.
A Dog looking out for its afternoon nap jumped into the Manger of an Ox and lay there cosily upon the straw.
After putting him in a stable, his new master filled his manger with straw, but Pinocchio, after tasting a mouthful, spat it out.
The first stall was a large square one, shut in behind with a wooden gate; the others were common stalls, good stalls, but not nearly so large; it had a low rack for hay and a low manger for corn; it was called a loose box, because the horse that was put into it was not tied up, but left loose, to do as he liked.
Adrienne went through the ante-chamber, which served also as a salle a manger, and passed a small saloon, into the bed-chamber of her parent.
"Voulez-vous manger? N'ayez pas peur, on ne vous fera pas de mal,"* he added shyly and affectionately, touching the boy's hand.
Folks came and worshipped the baby, as people have bowed before the kingship of the new-born since long before the Wise Men of the East knelt in homage to the Royal Babe of the Bethlehem manger. Leslie, slowly finding herself amid the new conditions of her life, hovered over it, like a beautiful, golden-crowned Madonna.
Only one was lazily eating oats, dipping its nose into the manger. It was still gray out-of-doors.
He found his horse and that of Porthos fastened to the manger, but to an empty manger.
Right down below the White Horse is a curious deep and broad gully called "the Manger," into one side of which the hills fall with a series of the most lovely sweeping curves, known as "the Giant's Stairs." They are not a bit like stairs, but I never saw anything like them anywhere else, with their short green turf, and tender bluebells, and gossamer and thistle-down gleaming in the sun and the sheep-paths running along their sides like ruled lines.