manic


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Related to manic: manic depression, Manic episode

man·ic

 (măn′ĭk)
adj.
1. Full of or characterized by frenetic activity or wild excitement: a manic fiddler; the manic pace of modern life.
2. Psychiatry Relating to or affected by mania.

[Greek manikos, mad, from maniā, madness; see mania.]

manic

(ˈmænɪk)
adj
(Psychiatry) characterizing, denoting, or affected by mania
n
(Psychiatry) a person afflicted with mania
[C19: from Greek, from mania]

man•ic

(ˈmæn ɪk)

adj.
pertaining to or affected by mania.
[1900–05]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.manic - affected with or marked by frenzy or mania uncontrolled by reasonmanic - affected with or marked by frenzy or mania uncontrolled by reason; "a frenzied attack"; "a frenzied mob"; "the prosecutor's frenzied denunciation of the accused"- H.W.Carter; "outbursts of drunken violence and manic activity and creativity"
wild - marked by extreme lack of restraint or control; "wild talk"; "wild parties"

manic

adjective
1. frenzied, intense, hectic, hyper (informal), frenetic, feverish He was possessed by an almost manic energy.
2. mad, crazy (informal), insane, crazed, wild, lunatic, demented, deranged, demonic, maniacal His face was frozen in a manic smile.
Translations
يُعاني من خَلَل عَقْلي
maniakální
manisk
mániás
óîuryfirspenntur, ólmur, ofvirkur
maniakálny
aşırı hareketli/heyecanlıçılgındeli

manic

[ˈmænɪk]
A. ADJ
1. (= insane) [person, behaviour] → maníaco; [smile, laughter, stare] → de maníaco
2. (= frenetic) [activity, energy] → frenético
B. CPD manic depression Nmaniacodepresión f
she suffers from manic depressionsufre maniacodepresión, es maniacodepresiva
manic depressive Nmaniacodepresivo/a m/f

manic

[ˈmænɪk] adj
(= excitable) [person] → maniaque
[laughter, grin] → hystérique
[activity] → frénétique; [enthusiasm, energy] → débordant(e)manic depression npsychose f maniaco-dépressive, cyclothymie fmanic-depressive [ˌmænɪkdɪˈprɛsɪv]
adj [person] → maniaco-dépressif/ive, cyclothymique
nmaniaco-dépressif/ive m/f, cyclothymique mf
to be diagnosed as a manic depressive → être diagnostiqué(e) maniaco-dépressif/ive, être diagnostiqué(e) cyclothymique

manic

adj
(= frenzied) activity, excitementfieberhaft; energy, personrasend
(= insane) grin, laughter, sense of humourwahnsinnig, irre; jealousyrasend
(Psych) state, depressionmanisch

manic

[ˈmænɪk] adj (Psych) → maniaco/a, maniacale

mania

(ˈmeiniə) noun
1. a form of mental illness in which the sufferer is over-active, over-excited, and unreasonably happy.
2. an unreasonable enthusiasm for something. He has a mania for fast cars.
ˈmaniac (-ӕk) noun
an insane (and dangerous) person; a madman. He drives like a maniac.
manic (ˈmӕnik) adjective
1. of, or suffering from, mania. She's in a manic state.
2. extremely energetic, active and excited. The new manager is one of those manic people who can't rest even for a minute.

manic

adj maníaco or maniaco
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Zeta-Jones has her battle disorder FACTS ABOUT BIPOLAR DISORDER | Around 1 in 100 people are diagnosed with bipolar disorder at some in their lives | Bipolar disorder used to be called manic depression | Stephen Fry and Catherine Zeta Jones are among celebrities who have spoken out about their personal battles with bipolar disorder | Bipolar disorder may be treated with medications known as mood stabilisers | Psychological therapies such as cognitive behavioural therapy or family therapy can also be effective For more information visit www.bipolaruk.org or call 0333 323 3880.
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