manic depression

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manic depression

n
(Psychiatry) a mental health problem characterized by an alternation between extreme euphoria and deep depression
Usage: Though manic depression, manic-depressive are still often used by the general public, they are seen as having negative connotations. The preferred terms nowadays are bipolar disorder and experiencing bipolar disorder
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.manic depression - a mental disorder characterized by episodes of mania and depressionmanic depression - a mental disorder characterized by episodes of mania and depression
affective disorder, emotional disorder, emotional disturbance, major affective disorder - any mental disorder not caused by detectable organic abnormalities of the brain and in which a major disturbance of emotions is predominant
cyclic disorder, cyclothymia, cyclothymic disorder - a mild bipolar disorder that persists over a long time
Translations

manic depression

n (Psych) → psicosi f inv maniaco-depressiva
References in periodicals archive ?
She left her job in New York and started a cross-country pilgrimage to find other young and successful manic-depressives.
This book is an invaluable resource for manic-depressives, their families and their teachers.
Tragically, one out of five untreated manic-depressives commits suicide.
Later I was told I was manic-depressive and now, at age 77, I am bipolar.
Unlike, for example, schizophrenics, manic-depressives are normal most of the time, and suffer from their disease only periodically; literal-minded scholars--and so many Woolf scholars have been painfully literal--cannot accept that a woman who was clearly sane for much of the time can have had anything much the matter with her.
It was therefore expected, given that manic-depressives score higher on Manic-Depressiveness and schizophrenics score higher on Magical Ideation (Thalbourne & Delin, 1994, Table 1, p.
When that thermostat malfunctions, as is the case with manic-depressives, one's entire world comes apart.
2 million Americans suffering from the disorder, more than two thirds are not receiving medical attention today: a fifth of these untreated manic-depressives will end their lives in suicide.
In one study, Richards and her coworkers found an abundance of everyday creativity in people who suffer from mild mood swings, as well as in mentally healthy relatives of manic-depressives (SN: 9/3/88, p.
Yet, of the estimated million Americans suffering from the disorder, more than two thirds are not receiving medical attention today: a fifth of these untreated manic-depressives will end their lives in suicide.
In the meantime, we have encountered a number of interesting anecdotes reported by manic-depressives about their apparent psychic experiences: Custance (1951), who kept a detailed record of his own manic episode, recounts a dream of his, the contents of which were cognized, apparently telepathically, by another patient (another manic-depressive); also, Smith (1990, p.