manikin


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man·i·kin

or man·ni·kin  (măn′ĭ-kĭn)
n.
1. A man who is short in stature.
2. A mannequin.
3. An anatomical model of the human body for use in teaching.

[Dutch mannekijn, from Middle Dutch, diminutive of man, man; see man- in Indo-European roots.]

manikin

(ˈmænɪkɪn) or

mannikin

;

manakin

n
1. a little man; dwarf or child
2. (Medicine)
a. an anatomical model of the body or a part of the body, esp for use in medical or art instruction
b. Also called: phantom an anatomical model of a fully developed fetus, for use in teaching midwifery or obstetrics
3. (Art Terms)
a. an anatomical model of the body or a part of the body, esp for use in medical or art instruction
b. Also called: phantom an anatomical model of a fully developed fetus, for use in teaching midwifery or obstetrics
4. (Clothing & Fashion) variant spellings of mannequin
5. (Art Terms) variant spellings of mannequin
[C17: from Dutch manneken, diminutive of man]

man•i•kin

or man•ni•kin

(ˈmæn ɪ kɪn)

n.
1. a little man; dwarf; pygmy.
[1560–70; < Dutch, =man man + -ken -kin]

manikin, mannikin

1. a dwarf, pygmy, or man of small stature.
2. a model of the human body, as used for teaching purposes in art, anatomy, etc. Also spelled mannequin.
See also: Size
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.manikin - a person who is very small but who is not otherwise deformed or abnormalmanikin - a person who is very small but who is not otherwise deformed or abnormal
small person - a person of below average size
2.manikin - a woman who wears clothes to display fashionsmanikin - a woman who wears clothes to display fashions; "she was too fat to be a mannequin"
assistant, helper, help, supporter - a person who contributes to the fulfillment of a need or furtherance of an effort or purpose; "my invaluable assistant"; "they hired additional help to finish the work"
supermodel - a fashion model who has attained the status of a celebrity
3.manikin - a life-size dummy used to display clothesmanikin - a life-size dummy used to display clothes
dummy - a figure representing the human form
Translations

manikin

n (= dwarf)Männchen nt, → Knirps m; (Art) → Modell nt, → Gliederpuppe f
References in classic literature ?
In order to be received among the thieves,* you must prove that you are good for something, and for that purpose, you must search the manikin.
These thousand tiny bells quivered for some time with the vibration of the rope, then gradually died away, and finally became silent when the manikin had been brought into a state of immobility by that law of the pendulum which has dethroned the water clock and the hour-glass.
Here's the gist of the matter in two words: you are to rise on tiptoe, as I tell you; in that way you will be able to reach the pocket of the manikin, you will rummage it, you will pull out the purse that is there,--and if you do all this without our hearing the sound of a bell, all is well: you shall be a vagabond.
They greeted one another, and the manikin asked him where he was going.
Well, if that is the case,' said the manikin, 'sit down beside me; we can rest for a little and have something to eat.
Round went the wheel again to the old song, and the manikin once more spun the heap into gold.
And brains, auntie, you've no idea how curious they are; I haven't got to them yet, but I long to, and uncle is going to show me a manikin that you can take to pieces.
Remembering the embalmed head, at first I almost thought that this black manikin was a real baby preserved in some similar manner.
She saw the abject manikin before her cowering, silent, in his chair.
This miniature theater was not much bigger than a man's coffin stood on end; the upper part was open and displayed a tinseled parlor--a good-sized handkerchief would have answered for a drop-curtain; the footlights consisted of a couple of candle-ends an inch long; various manikins the size of dolls appeared on the stage and made long speeches at each other, gesticulating a good deal, and they generally had a fight before they got through.
Do you mean to say," said Lady Muriel, "that these manikins of an inch high are to argue with me?
A man, any man, will go considerably out of his way to pick up a silver dollar; but here are golden words, which the wisest men of antiquity have uttered, and whose worth the wise of every succeeding age have assured us of; -- and yet we learn to read only as far as Easy Reading, the primers and class-books, and when we leave school, the "Little Reading," and story-books, which are for boys and beginners; and our reading, our conversation and thinking, are all on a very low level, worthy only of pygmies and manikins.