maniple

(redirected from manipulus)
Also found in: Medical.

man·i·ple

 (măn′ə-pəl)
n.
1. An ornamental silk band hung as an ecclesiastical vestment on the left arm near the wrist.
2. A subdivision of an ancient Roman legion, containing 60 or 120 men.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Latin manipulus, handful : manus, hand; see man- in Indo-European roots + -pulus, perhaps -ful; see pelə- in Indo-European roots.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

maniple

(ˈmænɪpəl)
n
1. (Historical Terms) (in ancient Rome) a unit of 120 to 200 foot soldiers
2. (Military) (in ancient Rome) a unit of 120 to 200 foot soldiers
3. (Historical Terms) Christianity an ornamental band formerly worn on the left arm by the celebrant at the Eucharist
4. (Ecclesiastical Terms) Christianity an ornamental band formerly worn on the left arm by the celebrant at the Eucharist
[C16: from Medieval Latin manipulus (the Eucharistic vestment), from Latin, literally: a handful, from manus hand]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

man•i•ple

(ˈmæn ə pəl)

n.
1. (in ancient Rome) a subdivision of a legion, consisting of 60 or 120 men.
2. a Eucharistic vestment consisting of an ornamental strip worn over the left arm near the wrist. See illus. at chasuble.
[1400–50; late Middle English: the vestment (< Middle French) < Medieval Latin manipulus, Latin: military unit, literally, handful =mani-, comb. form of manus hand + -pulus suffix of obscure orig., perhaps akin to plēnus full1]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

Maniple

 a handful; a small band of soldiers—Johnson, 1755.
Examples: maniple of papers and petitions, 1632; of people, 1829; of soldiers, 1755.
Dictionary of Collective Nouns and Group Terms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Preachers, Florilegia and Sermons: Studies on the Manipulus Florum of Thomas of Ireland.
Manipulus plantarum novarum praecipue America australioris (Suite).
Rouse, Preachers, Florilegia and Sermons: Studies on the Manipulus Florum of Thomas of Ireland, Studies and Texts 47 (Toronto: Pontifical Institute, 1979), 246-50.
I was pleased to read the two essays--one by James McEvoy, the other by Declan Lawell--on Thomas of Ireland, an early fourteenth-century interpreter of the Pseudo-Dionysius, who is better known for his anthology, the Manipulus florum.
(60) "Chimeram praedicari de Antichristo autore Sorbonista Anonymo"; "Manipulus quercuum, sive are comprehendendi transcendentia.