manor


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man·or

 (măn′ər)
n.
1.
a. A landed estate.
b. The main house on an estate; a mansion.
2. A tract of land in certain North American colonies with hereditary rights granted to the proprietor by royal charter.
3.
a. The district over which a lord had domain and could exercise certain rights and privileges in medieval western Europe.
b. The lord's residence in such a district.

[Middle English maner, manoir, from Old French maneir, manoir, to dwell, manor, from Latin manēre, to remain; see men- in Indo-European roots.]

ma·no′ri·al (mə-nôr′ē-əl) adj.

manor

(ˈmænə)
n
1. (Historical Terms) (in medieval Europe) the manor house of a lord and the lands attached to it
2. (Historical Terms) (before 1776 in some North American colonies) a tract of land granted with rights of inheritance by royal charter
3. (Architecture) a manor house
4. a landed estate
5. slang Brit a geographical area of operation, esp of a gang or local police force
[C13: from Old French manoir dwelling, from maneir to dwell, from Latin manēre to remain]
manorial adj

man•or

(ˈmæn ər)

n.
1. a feudal estate, consisting of a lord's house and adjoining lands over which he exercises control.
2. (in England) the house of a lord with the land belonging to it; a landed estate.
3. the main house or mansion on an estate, plantation, etc.
[1250–1300; Middle English maner < Anglo-French; Old French manoir, n. use of manoir to remain, dwell < Latin manēre to remain]
ma•no•ri•al (məˈnɔr i əl, -ˈnoʊr-) adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.manor - the mansion of a lord or wealthy personmanor - the mansion of a lord or wealthy person
manse, mansion house, mansion, residence, hall - a large and imposing house
2.manor - the landed estate of a lord (including the house on it)
acres, demesne, landed estate, estate, land - extensive landed property (especially in the country) retained by the owner for his own use; "the family owned a large estate on Long Island"

manor

noun manor house, seat, hall, mansion Thieves broke into the country manor at night.
Translations

manor

[ˈmænəʳ]
A. N
1. (feudal) → señorío m; (modern) → finca f
2. (Brit) (Police) → distrito m, barrio m
B. CPD manor house Ncasa f solariega, casa f señorial

manor

[ˈmænər] n (also manor house) → manoir m

manor

nGutshof m, → (Land)gut nt; lord/lady of the manorGutsherr m/-herrin f

manor

[ˈmænəʳ] n (also manor house) → maniero
References in classic literature ?
Contiguous to Mr Allworthy's estate was the manor of one of those gentlemen who are called preservers of the game.
About half a mile from the town, standing in an old park famous for its huge beech trees, is the ancient Manor House of Birlstone.
A little way past the inn we came upon a notice-board whereon the lord of the manor warned all wayfarers against trespassing on the common by making encampments, lighting fires or cutting firewood thereon, and to this fortunate circumstance I owe the most interesting story my companion had to tell.
Archibald Craven, who lived at Misselthwaite Manor, she looked so stony and stubbornly uninterested that they did not know what to think about her.
In the reign of King John one of them was rich enough to give a manor to the Knights Hospitallers; and in Edward the Second's time your forefather Brian was summoned to Westminster to attend the great Council there.
He wanted to get me home, he said, to have me all to himself, and to see me safely installed as the mistress of Grassdale Manor, just as single-minded, as naive, and piquante as I was; and as if I had been some frail butterfly, he expressed himself fearful of rubbing the silver off my wings by bringing me into contact with society, especially that of Paris and Rome; and, more-over, he did not scruple to tell me that there were ladies in both places that would tear his eyes out if they happened to meet him with me.
manor born' = from "to the manner born" Shakespeare, Hamlet, Act I, Scene 4, line 2--frequently misquoted in popular speech as "to the manor born"}
It was late in the afternoon when the four friends and their four-footed companion turned into the lane leading to Manor Farm; and even when they were so near their place of destination, the pleasure they would otherwise have experienced was materially damped as they reflected on the singularity of their appearance, and the absurdity of their situation.
Years ago the lord of the manor planted certain fruit trees on our farm; in the best part of it, too -- a grievous wrong and shame --"
As soon as Ogilvy saw me among the staring crowd on the edge of the pit he called to me to come down, and asked me if I would mind going over to see Lord Hilton, the lord of the manor.
Well, then," he said, "there's the Manor House, just opposite.
Raffles had been a guest worthy of finest incense, Dorothea had again taken up her abode at Lowick Manor.