manor


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man·or

 (măn′ər)
n.
1.
a. A landed estate.
b. The main house on an estate; a mansion.
2. A tract of land in certain North American colonies with hereditary rights granted to the proprietor by royal charter.
3.
a. The district over which a lord had domain and could exercise certain rights and privileges in medieval western Europe.
b. The lord's residence in such a district.

[Middle English maner, manoir, from Old French maneir, manoir, to dwell, manor, from Latin manēre, to remain; see men- in Indo-European roots.]

ma·no′ri·al (mə-nôr′ē-əl) adj.

manor

(ˈmænə)
n
1. (Historical Terms) (in medieval Europe) the manor house of a lord and the lands attached to it
2. (Historical Terms) (before 1776 in some North American colonies) a tract of land granted with rights of inheritance by royal charter
3. (Architecture) a manor house
4. a landed estate
5. slang Brit a geographical area of operation, esp of a gang or local police force
[C13: from Old French manoir dwelling, from maneir to dwell, from Latin manēre to remain]
manorial adj

man•or

(ˈmæn ər)

n.
1. a feudal estate, consisting of a lord's house and adjoining lands over which he exercises control.
2. (in England) the house of a lord with the land belonging to it; a landed estate.
3. the main house or mansion on an estate, plantation, etc.
[1250–1300; Middle English maner < Anglo-French; Old French manoir, n. use of manoir to remain, dwell < Latin manēre to remain]
ma•no•ri•al (məˈnɔr i əl, -ˈnoʊr-) adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.manor - the mansion of a lord or wealthy personmanor - the mansion of a lord or wealthy person
manse, mansion house, mansion, residence, hall - a large and imposing house
2.manor - the landed estate of a lord (including the house on it)
acres, demesne, landed estate, estate, land - extensive landed property (especially in the country) retained by the owner for his own use; "the family owned a large estate on Long Island"

manor

noun manor house, seat, hall, mansion Thieves broke into the country manor at night.
Translations

manor

[ˈmænəʳ]
A. N
1. (feudal) → señorío m; (modern) → finca f
2. (Brit) (Police) → distrito m, barrio m
B. CPD manor house Ncasa f solariega, casa f señorial

manor

[ˈmænər] n (also manor house) → manoir m

manor

nGutshof m, → (Land)gut nt; lord/lady of the manorGutsherr m/-herrin f

manor

[ˈmænəʳ] n (also manor house) → maniero
References in classic literature ?
I was just in time; for the Church, the lord of the manor, and the rest of the tax-gatherers would have been along next day and swept off pretty much all the stock, leaving the swine-herds very short of hogs and Sandy out of princesses.
In showing kindness to his cousins therefore he had the real satisfaction of a good heart; and in settling a family of females only in his cottage, he had all the satisfaction of a sportsman; for a sportsman, though he esteems only those of his sex who are sportsmen likewise, is not often desirous of encouraging their taste by admitting them to a residence within his own manor.
When Mary Lennox was sent to Misselthwaite Manor to live with her uncle everybody said she was the most disagreeable-looking child ever seen.
As to strong beer, there's enough of it in the cellars already, to drown the Manor House.
A little way past the inn we came upon a notice-board whereon the lord of the manor warned all wayfarers against trespassing on the common by making encampments, lighting fires or cutting firewood thereon, and to this fortunate circumstance I owe the most interesting story my companion had to tell.
But the same worthy person, when placed in his own snug parlour, and surrounded by all the comforts of an Englishman's fireside, is not half so much disposed to believe that his own ancestors led a very different life from himself; that the shattered tower, which now forms a vista from his window, once held a baron who would have hung him up at his own door without any form of trial; that the hinds, by whom his little pet-farm is managed, a few centuries ago would have been his slaves; and that the complete influence of feudal tyranny once extended over the neighbouring village, where the attorney is now a man of more importance than the lord of the manor.
As soon as Ogilvy saw me among the staring crowd on the edge of the pit he called to me to come down, and asked me if I would mind going over to see Lord Hilton, the lord of the manor.
Bingley intended it likewise, and sometimes made choice of his county; but as he was now provided with a good house and the liberty of a manor, it was doubtful to many of those who best knew the easiness of his temper, whether he might not spend the remainder of his days at Netherfield, and leave the next generation to purchase.
manor born' = from "to the manner born" Shakespeare, Hamlet, Act I, Scene 4, line 2--frequently misquoted in popular speech as "to the manor born"}
It had been foolish modesty in him hitherto to conceal the fact that a branch of the Freelys held a manor in Yorkshire, and to shut up the portrait of his great uncle the admiral, instead of hanging it up where a family portrait should be hung--over the mantelpiece in the parlour.
From his eighth to his thirteenth year he attended the Manor House school, at Stoke-Newington, a suburb of London.
They were on the upper floor, and from our window we could command a view of the avenue gate, and of the inhabited wing of Stoke Moran Manor House.