manorialism


Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to manorialism: feudalism

manorialism

(məˈnɔːrɪəˌlɪzəm)
n
(Historical Terms) the economic and social structure of medieval Europe which rendered peasants dependent on both their lord and their land

manorialism

1. the system of manorial social and political organization, as in the Middle Ages.
2. its principles and practices.
3. Sometimes Pejorative. any small, strong unit of local political and social organization.
See also: Society
1. the system of manorial social and political organization, as in the Middle Ages.
2. Sometimes Pejorative. any small, strong unit of local political and social organization.
See also: Government
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Answering to a question PTI founding member Najeeb Haroon said that our party's motive is to finish nepotism and manorialism system.
Answering to a question, PTI founding member Najeeb Haroon said that his party's motive is to finish nepotism and manorialism system.
The first concerns Prussian manorialism and feudalism during the "Second Serfdom," which lasted from the end of the Thirty Years' War to the collapse of "Old Prussia" in 1807 following Napoleon's conquest of Prussia.
In 11 chapters he describes manorialism, feudalism, nationalism, papism--collectively responsible for feeding the population boom brought about by the warm period; delineates village life and chivalric warfare--which set the stage for the Hundred YearsAE War; and, informed by modern science, continues the discussion of climate change and its influence on the environment and human activity.
Kari Boyd McBride writes that the discourse "drew on idealized feudal, social and economic relationships, represented most conspicuously through the theory and practice of hospitality, invoking a utopia of medieval nostalgia that stood as a rebuke to all that was new while, paradoxically, accommodating the very change it excoriated." (25) The invocation of this nostalgia was partly a response to the shift during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries from a system of manorialism to "a society dominated both economically and politically by the middle class." (26) During this change of the nature of power, this country house discourse, asserts McBride, functioned as a kind of "script" for the "performance of legitimacy," often rendered not unlike chorography.
Although seigneurial lordships and manorialism withered away very early in North and Central Italy, the old elements of rural repression were replaced by new forms of urban domination.
Bonds of manorialism became weak as land leases were lengthened, and the tenants began to acquire exclusive rights over land.