mantua

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Man·tu·a

 (măn′cho͞o-ə, -to͞o-ə)
A city of northern Italy south-southwest of Verona. Originally an Etruscan settlement, it is noted as the birthplace of the Roman poet Virgil (70 bc).

Man′tu·an adj. & n.

man·tu·a

 (măn′cho͞o-ə, -to͞o-ə)
n.
A woman's garment of the 1600s and 1700s consisting of a bodice and full skirt cut from a single length of fabric, with the skirt designed to part in front to reveal a contrasting underskirt.

[Alteration (influenced by Mantua) of manteau.]

mantua

(ˈmæntjʊə)
n
(Clothing & Fashion) a loose gown of the 17th and 18th centuries, worn open in front to show the underskirt
[C17: changed from manteau, through the influence of Mantua]

Mantua

(ˈmæntjʊə)
n
(Placename) a city in N Italy, in E Lombardy, surrounded by lakes: birthplace of Virgil. Pop: 47 790 (2001). Italian name: Mantova

man•tu•a

(ˈmæn tʃu ə)

n., pl. -tu•as.
a woman's loose gown worn in the early 18th century.
[1670–80; alter. of French manteau coat]

Man•tu•a

(ˈmæn tʃu ə)

n.
a city in N Italy: birthplace of Virgil. 60,932. Italian, Man•to•va (ˈmɑn tɔ vɑ)
Man′tu•an, adj., n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.mantua - loose gown of the 17th and 18th centuriesmantua - loose gown of the 17th and 18th centuries
gown - a woman's dress, usually with a close-fitting bodice and a long flared skirt, often worn on formal occasions
Translations

Mantua

[ˈmæntjʊə] nMantova
References in classic literature ?
Finding, then, that, in fact he could not move, he thought himself of having recourse to his usual remedy, which was to think of some passage in his books, and his craze brought to his mind that about Baldwin and the Marquis of Mantua, when Carloto left him wounded on the mountain side, a story known by heart by the children, not forgotten by the young men, and lauded and even believed by the old folk; and for all that not a whit truer than the miracles of Mahomet.
The king, however, having acquired Lombardy, regained at once the authority which Charles had lost: Genoa yielded; the Florentines became his friends; the Marquess of Mantua, the Duke of Ferrara, the Bentivogli, my lady of Forli, the Lords of Faenza, of Pesaro, of Rimini, of Camerino, of Piombino, the Lucchese, the Pisans, the Sienese--everybody made advances to him to become his friend.
Venice Preserved too,' said she, 'I think you have been there is it well or ill preserved for people differ so and Maccaroni if they really eat it like the conjurors why not cut it shorter, you are acquainted Arthur--dear Doyce and Clennam at least not dear and most assuredly not Doyce for I have not the pleasure but pray excuse me--acquainted I believe with Mantua what has it got to do with Mantua-making for I never have been able to conceive?