manuhiri

manuhiri

(ˌmɑːnuːˈhiːrɪ)
n
1. (Anthropology & Ethnology) a visitor to a Māori marae
2. (Anthropology & Ethnology) a Māori term for a non-Māori person, seen as a guest in the country
[Māori]
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References in periodicals archive ?
In my tribal area, seating for the manuhiri (visitors) is situated to the left of the outstretched arms of the ancestral meeting house.
d) as expressed in multiple whakatauki, including, for instance, "he tangata takahi manuhiri, he marae puehu, he whare pungawerewere (29)" A marae puehu can be interpreted as a marae at which only dust remains (ie without people or interactions), which is a disadvantage to the haukainga on a number of levels.
The kawa must be explained to all, including manuhiri and new members of the group.
As the conference opened, Victoria's Toiahurei, Professor Piri Sciascia, offered a formal welcome to all manuhiri.
For one thing going through it is a public acceptance of one's position as manuhiri (guest) of the tangata whenua (hosts) who are owners of the land.
Mikaere connects these relationships to the land with the conceptual regulators of tangata whenua (hosts) and manuhiri (guests).
Along with the ESR non-Maori researchers, she therefore had manuhiri (visitor) status, observed ceremonially/ritually in situations in which the researchers came together with the local people.
A cultural embedding in appropriate order, this chronology extends from the silence that falls upon the manuhiri as they draw near to their destination, through the sequential process of correct observance and ritual until the cycle complete, the manuhiri become part of the tangata whenua and bring in the new arrivals in their turn.
11) The terminology of tangata whenua (host) and manuhiri (guest) has been gestured towards, but remains relatively underexplored in literary and socio-cultural analysis.
Each division serves its own purpose in terms of discerning difference and grouping people on the basis of physical, intrinsic, seemingly esoteric thresholds or attributes for example, mate/ora, tangata whenua/ manuhiri, rangatira/ringawera, tane/ wahine, puhi/pakeke, kauwae runga/ kauwae taro and tapu/noa.
For example, it is an obligation to extend manaaki to the manuhiri.