many-sided

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man·y-sid·ed

(mĕn′ē-sī′dĭd)
adj.
1. Having many sides.
2. Having many aspects, talents, or interests.

man′y-sid′ed·ness n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

many-sided

adj
having many sides, aspects, etc: a many-sided personality.
ˌmany-ˈsidedness n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

man′y-sid′ed



adj.
1. having many sides or aspects: a many-sided question.
2. having many interests or talents; versatile: a many-sided person.
[1650–60]
man′y-sid′ed•ness, n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.many-sided - having many parts or sidesmany-sided - having many parts or sides    
2.many-sided - having many aspects; "a many-sided subject"; "a multifaceted undertaking"; "multifarious interests"; "the multifarious noise of a great city"; "a miscellaneous crowd"
varied - characterized by variety; "immigrants' varied ethnic and religious traditions"; "his work is interesting and varied"
3.many-sided - full of variety or interest; "a many-sided personality"
colourful, colorful - striking in variety and interest; "a colorful period of history"; "a colorful character"; "colorful language"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

many-sided

adjective
Having many aspects, uses, or abilities:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations

many-sided

[ˈmenɪˈsaɪdɪd] ADJ
1. [figure] → multilátero
2. (fig) [talent, personality] → multifacético, polifacético; [problem] → complicado
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

many-sided

[ˌmɛnɪˈsaɪdɪd] adj (object) → che ha molti lati (fig) (problem, question) → complesso/a, che ha molte sfaccettature
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
Leaning back in the cab, this amateur bloodhound carolled away like a lark while I meditated upon the many-sidedness of the human mind.
We may be tempted to relate this many-sidedness with Baudry's only stated alternative to Renaissance space: that of the ancient Greeks, for whom, according to Baudry, "space is discontinuous and heterogeneous ...
Complexity and many-sidedness of opiate addiction problem requires work-up in various directions with synthesis of findings accumulated in the course of studying not only psychic sphere, but CNS as a whole, higher brain functions included.
While forming the set of criteria for the assessment of competition factors, the principle of many-sidedness of the phenomenon is observed and both qualitative and quantitative criteria are included.
President Barack Obama's policy of engagement and many-sidedness," he added.
For there is much to the many-sidedness of truth that can often get left behind in such simplifying moves--these manoeuvres of ours which are, too much, only truth's very covering over; as categories get trotted out as truisms after a while, as empty-intentions, learnt by wrote, as self-evident truths that nobody can remember the proofs for anymore-and what the Hegelian dialectic does here, perhaps, is deploy one of the most sophisticated attempts ever in history and since the great Plato-Socrates himself, to deal with this phenomenon.
And it depends on the exercise of virtue, or rather a constellation of qualities of mind and character, befitting a free person: generosity in giving to each what he or she is owed as a person, respect for reason and its limits, and the propensity to see the many-sidedness of moral and political matters.
Mill, and George Eliot, in a group of writers who "brought new prominence to a liberal vision of 'many-sidedness,' a temperamental and intellectual attainment involving practices of self-criticism, open-mindedness, and earnest conduct."
That was part of his charm, a sign of his cultivated sense of the many-sidedness of the world.
Trapnell contended that if we examine some principal Indian thinkers--the Buddha, Jain philosophers, and Mahatma Gandhi--we find that it is indeed possible to grant autonomy and truth-status to other traditions if one has first undergone spiritual discipline that leads eventually to "a fundamental transformation in consciousness, the implications of which may be intimated beforehand but cannot be lived consistently prior to that transformation." (50) I will focus on the support Trapnell drew for this conclusion from the doctrine of many-sidedness, because of the interesting differences between it and Hick's hypothesis.