maplike

maplike

(ˈmæpˌlaɪk)
adj
resembling a map
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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The world got more and more extensive and maplike. Click, clock, clitter-clock.
In hepatic posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder, there is a characteristic, maplike expansion of the portal tracts.
These ranged from a one-hundred-year-old Congolese textile, with its nearly twenty-foot-long non-repeating maplike pattern, to an immense drawing by the young Australian artist Donna Huddleston.
A condition in which splotches give the tongue a maplike appearance.
The ceiling is adorned with pipes, light systems, shelves, sliding door switches, and faucets arranged with maplike complexity, intended to represent how a city might be created and how connections might be built.
However, they failed to test for context or to identify how symbols are interpreted when experienced in conjunction with other symbols and in real maplike layouts.
Meanwhile, Quick-to-See Smith draws on Native sources for language and iconography, collaging pages from a Flathood newspaper into her composition and forming the maplike outline as a buffalo petroglyph.
It has a suite of products for enterprise markets, all using a variety of ingenious maplike presentations.
I remember loving the look of the sentences, short or long, once they were tidied into diagrams--the curious maplike shapes they made, the way the words settled primly along their horizontals like houses on a road, the way some roads were culs-de-sac and some were long meandering interstates with many exit ramps and scenic lookouts.
Afterwards, he overheard the conversation between two local councillors who were gazing at one of 'Ernie's flattened and maplike, hard-to-understand conceptual paintings of somewhere in the Rhondda'.
As though the holy spirite of truth mente by his appearing in cloven tounges, to debarre any nation, or any tounge, from uttering forth the magnificent majestie of God's miraculous workes." (19) In a plural order of sovereign nations and sovereign languages, each equally viable in the pursuit and maintenance of God's truth, the privileged truth-claims of Rome and its language vanish under a maplike conception of the world.
In short she turns the visual maplike medium into a sensual garden experience.