marabou

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mar·a·bou

also mar·a·bout  (măr′ə-bo͞o′)
n.
1. A large African stork (Leptoptilos crumeniferus) that scavenges for carrion and has a naked head and neck, black wings, and soft white down on the underside. Also called marabou stork.
2.
a. The down of this stork or an imitation of it made from other bird feathers.
b. A hat or garment trimmed with this down or an imitation of it.
3.
a. A raw silk that can be dyed without being separated from the gum.
b. Fabric or an article of clothing made from such silk.

[French marabout, Muslim hermit or saint, marabou (in the latter sense, influenced by modern colloquial Arabic (Maghrebi) murābiṭ, Muslim hermit or saint, marabou, this stork being considered holy in North African tradition); see marabout1.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

marabou

(ˈmærəˌbuː)
n
1. (Animals) a large black-and-white African carrion-eating stork, Leptoptilos crumeniferus, with a very short naked neck and a straight heavy bill. See also adjutant bird
2. (Animals) a down feather of this bird, used to trim garments
3. (Textiles)
a. a fine white raw silk
b. fabric made of this
[C19: from French, from Arabic murābit marabout, so called because the stork is considered a holy bird in Islam]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

mar•a•bou

(ˈmær əˌbu)

also marabout



n., pl. -bous.
1. any of several naked-headed, carrion-eating storks of the genus Leptoptilus, esp. L. crumeniferus, of sub-Saharan Africa.
2. material made from the feathers of marabous and used to trim women's hats and clothing.
3.
a. thrown silk that can be dyed without being scoured.
b. a fabric made of such silk.
[1815–25; < French marabout literally, marabout]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.marabou - large African black-and-white carrion-eating storkmarabou - large African black-and-white carrion-eating stork; its downy underwing feathers are used to trim garments
marabou - the downy feathers of marabou storks are used for trimming garments
stork - large mostly Old World wading birds typically having white-and-black plumage
genus Leptoptilus, Leptoptilus - adjutant birds and marabous
2.marabou - the downy feathers of marabou storks are used for trimming garmentsmarabou - the downy feathers of marabou storks are used for trimming garments
feather, plumage, plume - the light horny waterproof structure forming the external covering of birds
Leptoptilus crumeniferus, marabou, marabou stork, marabout - large African black-and-white carrion-eating stork; its downy underwing feathers are used to trim garments
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

marabou

nMarabu m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

marabou

[ˈmærəˌbuː] n (bird) → marabù m inv
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
It was not for some weeks after the Crawleys' departure that the landlord of the hotel which they occupied during their residence at Paris found out the losses which he had sustained: not until Madame Marabou, the milliner, made repeated visits with her little bill for articles supplied to Madame Crawley; not until Monsieur Didelot from Boule d'Or in the Palais Royal had asked half a dozen times whether cette charmante Miladi who had bought watches and bracelets of him was de retour.
Increasingly, Marabous have become dependent on human garbage and hundreds of the huge birds can be found around African dumps or waiting for a handout in urban areas.
The birds work together for the greater good of Zambesia except for the marabous (Jim Cummings) who are in cahoots with a giant lizard, Ajax (Jeff Goldblum).
'Visitors to the zoo just love the storks, but marabous are a difficult species to breed with the European climate.