marasmus


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ma·ras·mus

 (mə-răz′məs)
n.
A progressive wasting of the body, occurring chiefly in young children and associated with insufficient intake or malabsorption of food.

[New Latin, from Greek marasmos, from marainein, to waste away; see mer- in Indo-European roots.]

ma·ras′mic adj.

marasmus

(məˈræzməs)
n
(Pathology) pathol general emaciation and wasting, esp of infants, thought to be associated with severe malnutrition or impaired utilization of nutrients
[C17: from New Latin, from Greek marasmos, from marainein to waste]
maˈrasmic adj

ma•ras•mus

(məˈræz məs)

n.
malnutrition occurring in infants and young children, caused by insufficient intake of calories or protein and characterized by thinness, dry skin, poor muscle development, and irritability.
[1650–60; < New Latin < Greek marasmós a wasting away, akin to maraínein to weaken]
ma•ras′mic, adj.
ma•ras′moid, adj.

marasmus

1. a wasting away or atrophying of the body in the absence of disease.
2. the progressive emaciation that results from malnutrition. — marasmic, adj.
See also: Body, Human
1. a wasting away or atrophying of the body in the absence of disease.
2. the progressive emaciation that results from malnutrition. — marasmic, adj.
See also: Disease and Illness
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.marasmus - extreme malnutrition and emaciation (especially in children)marasmus - extreme malnutrition and emaciation (especially in children); can result from inadequate intake of food or from malabsorption or metabolic disorders
malnutrition - a state of poor nutrition; can result from insufficient or excessive or unbalanced diet or from inability to absorb foods
Translations
Marasmus

ma·ras·mus

n. marasmo, emaciación debida a malnutrición, esp. en la infancia.
References in periodicals archive ?
When Immanuel Kant died in 1804, he left on his desk twelve fascicles of manuscript that he had been working on since 1795, impeded by a progressive marasmus, until, "in December, 1803, he became incapable of signing his name."(4) Soon after Kant's death, his survivors judged the manuscripts to be unfit for publication.
Kwashiorkor and Marasmus account for 5-31 percent of admissions in rural hospitals.
Severe cases of protein-energy malnutrition such as marasmus and kwashiorkor are seen infrequently.
You were nothing/then; you were underwater but not drowned,/a contradiction I loved." Humor in the form of delight ripples through these lines and shows up full-blown in the poem "Kwashiorkor; Marasmus' " a flight into imagined definitions, including An unknown river whose banks drip feathers" and A longforgotten,/one-sided battle won easily by imperialists." A love of words and a devotion to those "who pumped one oar/ among thousands at Lepanto, ocean/up to his clavicles and rising" rule this book.
He didn't look as sick as many of the more emaciated toddlers suffering from marasmus, the name given to calorie-deficient malnutrition.
Conduction velocity of motor nerves in children suffering from protein-calorie malnutrition and marasmus. Electromyography and Clinical Neurophysiology 1976;16(4):381-92.
A large proportion (86%) were younger than 25 months and 42% were admitted with kwashiorkor, whereas 33% were admitted with marasmus. It was noteworthy that 28% and 8% of patients were at stages III and IV of HIV infection, respectively.
[4] The term protein-energy malnutrition applies to a group of related disorders that include Marasmus, kwashiorkor, and intermediate states of marasmic-kwashiorkor.
Majority (82%) of children with SAM had marasmus whereas 18% had edematous malnutrition.
Severe protein energy malnutrition (PEM) describes a spectrum of clinical syndromes ranging from kwashiorkor to severe marasmus.2,3 Kwashiorkor is characterized by the presence of edema and has a high mortality rate.4
Many people became victims of kwashiorkor and marasmus. As Indian population increased from around 330 million at the time of independence to 1250 million in 68 years, malnutrition and undernourishment became rampant.
The most common cause of death among such children was listed as "Atrophy, Debility, Marasmus" (15) accounting for a third of deaths.