mare liberum


Also found in: Thesaurus, Legal, Wikipedia.
Related to mare liberum: mare clausum, international waters

mare liberum

(ˈmɑːreɪ ˈliːbərʊm)
n
(Law) law a sea open to navigation by shipping of all nations
[Latin: free sea]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

ma•re li•be•rum

(ˈmɛər i ˈlɪb ər əm, ˈmɑr eɪ)
n.
a body of navigable water to which all nations have unrestricted access.
[< Latin: free sea]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

mare liberum

a body or stretch of navigable water to which all nations or countries have unrestricted access. Cf. mare clausum.
See also: Sea
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.mare liberum - (free sea) a navigable body of water to which all nations have equal accessmare liberum - (free sea) a navigable body of water to which all nations have equal access
waterway - a navigable body of water
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Anis Bajrektarevic as "the (Trans-Siberian/Maglev train of) Heartland or (Mare Liberum of) Rimland?", this current development should be seen as an opener not a dividing line.
But earlier in the 17th century, Hugo Grotius published his seminal work, 'Mare Liberum.' Under this view, the sea should be open to all states for exploration and trade, irrespective of naval capabilities.
He produced a massive treatise on the question of war booty, of which a single chapter was published in 1609 as Mare Liberum, (The Free Sea).
Following this, Hamid presents the principle of mare liberum (free sea, in which the ocean is free for any countries to navigate through and utilize) that was applied by the Makassar Kingdom (Chapter 8).
As Bown asserts, it is true that the treaty inspired Hugo Grotius to argue, in his Mare Liberum [1609], in favor of freedom of navigation and thus launched a philosophical and legal debate over this issue that continues to the present day.
In this scholarly and tightly-argued book, Peter Borschberg re-examines Hugo Grotius's De Iure Praedae (and that part of it that appeared as Mare Liberum in particular), considering why and how the jurist composed the work, what sources he used, and what long-term impact resulted.
It was Grotius' arguments presented in his Mare Liberum, outlining the right of all nations to free trade and navigation, which played an important role in the coming to terms of the Twelve Years' Truce.
Alexandrowicz traces the seventeenth-century legal debate between the Portuguese and Dutch concerning sovereignty in Asia that arose from the publication of Hugo Grotius's Mare Liberum.
Though the East Indian context was uppermost in Grotius's argument and provided the spur for its publication, this did not prevent James's subjects from imagining that his claims to freedom of the seas were made at the expense of their own demands for new restrictions on Dutch fishing rights: `K[ing] James coming in the Dutch put out Mare Liberum, made as if aimed at mortifying the Spaniards' usurpation in the W.