margined


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mar·gin

 (mär′jĭn)
n.
1. An edge and the area immediately adjacent to it; a border. See Synonyms at border.
2. The blank space bordering the written or printed area on a page.
3. A limit in a condition or process, beyond or below which something is no longer possible or acceptable: the margin of reality; has crossed the margin of civilized behavior.
4. An amount allowed beyond what is needed: a small margin of safety. See Synonyms at room.
5. A measure, quantity, or degree of difference: a margin of 500 votes.
6. Economics
a. The minimum return that an enterprise may earn and still pay for itself.
b. The difference between the cost and the selling price of securities or commodities.
c. The difference between the market value of collateral and the face value of a loan.
7. An amount in money, or represented by securities, deposited by a customer with a broker as a provision against loss on transactions made on account.
8. Botany The border of a leaf.
tr.v. mar·gined, mar·gin·ing, mar·gins
1. To provide with a margin.
2. To be a margin to; border.
3. To inscribe or enter in the margin of a page.
4. Economics
a. To add margin to: margin up a brokerage account.
b. To deposit margin for: margin a transaction.
c. To buy or hold (securities) by depositing or adding to a margin.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Latin margō, margin-; see merg- in Indo-European roots.]

mar′gined adj.
References in periodicals archive ?
AcadiaSoft Inc., the leading industry provider of margin automation solutions for counterparties engaged in collateral management worldwide, announced a number of industry milestones that have been achieved via its services through Ql 2018, as well as a new 100% Industry Margin Automation Initiative designed to automate the balance of Credit Support Annex (CSA) agreements that aren't yet margined electronically.
When your margined securities fall below a certain level, you'll receive a "margin call,'' requiring an infusion of additional cash.